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Stern-Gerlach with electrons

  1. Mar 16, 2014 #1

    bobie

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    Just a simple question:
    what happens to an electron beam in a S-G apparatus , does it split up in two spin-up/spin-down?
    if not, can you tell why?

    Thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 16, 2014 #2

    Simon Bridge

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  4. Mar 16, 2014 #3

    mfb

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    In theory, it could. In practice, however, the Lorentz force completely dominates as electrons are charged objects. Every tiny inhomogeneity in the setup (beyond the necessary one for the magnetic field), a tiny beam divergence and so on will ruin the separation. It is probably not impossible, but really hard, and I did not see it realized yet.
     
  5. Mar 16, 2014 #4

    Vanadium 50

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    I just Googled "Stern-Gerlach with electrons" and got 148,000 results. It would be helpful if you were to take a look at a few of these and then ask questions about specific things you don't understand.
     
  6. Mar 16, 2014 #5

    bobie

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    Simon's link says the same:
    I wonder why with Google I got only 4 hits , (most, German articles:https://www.google.it/search?num=10....1.0....0...1c.1.37.serp..0.1.171.PitejvVSe0c)
    I was searching for a definitive proof that spin is an intrinsic property of the electron, present also when it is not orbiting in an atom, or even at rest.
    Of course I do not understand many things , I have read a few threads here and I see I am not the only one.
    I can't see, for example, how an electron at rest can have angular or particularly a magnetic moment, and how an intrinsic property can have two opposing values.
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2014
  7. Mar 16, 2014 #6

    Dale

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    This kind of bait and switch tactic in questioning is not appropriate. If that is what you want to know then ask directly about that. Do not ask about an experiment which is not suited to measuring the thing you are actually interested in. It wastes everyone's time, frustrates the participants, and gives a bad impression of you.

    http://gabrielse.physics.harvard.ed...ronMagneticMoment/ElectronMagneticMoment.html
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2014
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