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Steve Jobs resigns

  1. Aug 24, 2011 #1

    Dembadon

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  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 24, 2011 #2

    russ_watters

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    I don't buy that logic even a little bit.
     
  4. Aug 24, 2011 #3
    No he wasn't, macs are still expensive.
     
  5. Aug 24, 2011 #4
    I am not sure about the causation but Apple had high profits under his leadership.

    I think the true test of a good leader is in how well a company does after s/he is gone. As a leader, if the company can't succeed without you, how great can you claim to be?

    This makes no sense to me.
     
  6. Aug 24, 2011 #5

    Dembadon

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    Why not?
     
  7. Aug 24, 2011 #6
    He looks skinnier and skinnier. He did a lot for Apple.
     
  8. Aug 24, 2011 #7
    Because, if you leave and the company does poorly under a new leader, than that is that leader's fault, not the former leader's. A way to determine leadership is how well the company did while they were in control.

    At least in my opinion.
     
  9. Aug 24, 2011 #8

    Astronuc

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    He doesn't look too good - actually he looks ashen and gaunt.

    Apple has $76 billion in cash, which on July 29, 2011 was $2 billion more than the US Treasury. Not to bad! I would expect that Apple's cash exceeds its debt.

    http://articles.latimes.com/2011/jul/29/business/la-fi-apple-cash-20110730

    http://finance.yahoo.com/q/ks?s=AAPL
    Management Effectiveness
    Return on Assets (ttm): 22.25%
    Return on Equity (ttm): 41.99%

    Stock price $376.18 (8/24/11), up from about $70/share in 2007 - five years ago.
    Splits: Jun 16, 1987 [2:1], Jun 21, 2000 [2:1], Feb 28, 2005 [2:1]

    One could have bought it for ~$10/share in the early years.

    It's interesting to compare AAPL vs MSFT
     
  10. Aug 24, 2011 #9

    Dembadon

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    I guess I'll elaborate.

    A leader needs to do everything in their power to ensure that the company is set up to be successful not just in the present, but also in the future. If I, as a leader, can't train others to carry my vision and values, then I don't think that speaks well of my leadership abilities.

    Here are a few things off the top of my head that can be done to help the company after I'm gone:

    • Train others to be leaders. If I'm the only one who knows how to run the company, then that's pretty short-sighted.
    • Surround myself with people I trust and know will perpetuate what I've started. If I hire an incompetent person to take over, that's my fault.
    • Implement systems/methods/ideas/goals/etc. that are wise for the company, long term. What good are strategies that only make me look good? Shouldn't there be accountability for the integrity of what I implement?

    I had some others but forgot them. I'll have to come back later.
     
  11. Aug 24, 2011 #10

    Evo

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  12. Aug 24, 2011 #11

    Dembadon

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    Sure, it's entirely possible that the new leader screwed things up. However, it's also possible that the old leader was a poor judge of character, leading to the promotion of an imbecile. In that case, the old leader is partially accountable.
     
  13. Aug 24, 2011 #12
    i understand exactly what you're talking about. it's basically the difference between running a dictatorship and building a republic that will outlive oneself because you've built competence and robustness into the system. the dictator can do very well for himself, but plays his cards close to his chest. the leader is not a paranoid sociopath, but someone who considers his team his most valuable asset. dictatorships can work very well at times, but overall experience high volatility when the head changes. republics are slow but reliable, and stand the test of time.
     
  14. Aug 25, 2011 #13
    Although a leader may have some influence over the future, they will always have even greater and more direct influence over the present.
     
  15. Aug 25, 2011 #14

    Pengwuino

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    All of which are things a new leader can toss out the window.

    The board decides who replaces Jobs, not Jobs himself alone.
     
  16. Aug 25, 2011 #15
    He resigned effective... January. It only became official today.
     
  17. Aug 25, 2011 #16

    Pengwuino

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    You.... do realize Apple never meant to make macs cheaper right? Hell, it was one of their "luxury item" selling points.
     
  18. Aug 25, 2011 #17

    turbo

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    There has been a bit of "cult of personality" built up around Jobs, IMO. That's not necessarily a bad thing, but it can lead to unreasonable expectations regarding the future of Apple, both favorable and unfavorable in his absence. Apple is a very large company with a successful product line. It should continue to perform well, but will perceptions drive stock prices down, without Jobs? We'll see.

    Apple has a really die-hard following for its products that Dell, Toshiba, Asus, Gateway, and others don't. Will that brand-loyalty stay strong? I'd expect a modest dip in Apple's share prices short-term, to be followed by a rebound when their next hardware roll-out occurs.
     
  19. Aug 25, 2011 #18

    Astronuc

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    Steve Jobs Reshaped Industries
    By DAVID POGUE
    http://pogue.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/08/25/steve-jobs-reshaped-industries/
     
  20. Aug 26, 2011 #19

    Ivan Seeking

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    You are talking about both culture and structure, if I understand your argument, and I agree for the most part. Each company has its own culture, and that is a direct reflection of its leadership. While I think culture does play a role in the short term, over I think it is difficult to maintain when the leadership changes. As much as each person is unique, so by definition are CEOs and company Presidents and the cultures they spawn.

    Also, there is one concept that I think you are ignoring. No matter how strong the culture and structure of a company might be, it is all but impossible to replace raw genius by design. Jobs was unique and impossible to replace. While Apple may go one to be tremendously successful, no one can ever fill his shoes as he did. Conversely, there is nothig to say Jobs was the best man for the job anymore. Perhaps his time has passed and it's time for new blood.
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2011
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