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I "stickyness" and friction?

  1. Oct 26, 2016 #1
    is "stickyness" part of the static friction? is it already integrated in coefficient of static friction μ or there is some special case where you put "coefficient of stickyness" in formula μ*N when things get sticky? I imagine peace of tape on some flat, relatively smooth surface. you have to pull it with relatively high amount of force in order to set it in linear motion. I suppouse area of that peace of tape also has some significance by means larger the peace of tape is larger the static friction would be?
     
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  3. Oct 26, 2016 #2
    I believe that you could just increase the coefficients of friction (static or otherwise) to compensate for the "stickyness". I have not yet run into coefficients of stickyness in my studies. Just coefficients of friction. Are you working on anything specific, or just curious.
     
  4. Oct 27, 2016 #3

    A.T.

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    That simple model doesn't really apply to adhesive tape, which can stick even when N=0 or even N<0.
     
  5. Oct 27, 2016 #4
    just curious :D I had the same idea about compensation for example that miu can be much grater than one.

    could you explain me a bit about that N=0 and N<0 cases, I am just curious, and how N can be less than zero? thanks!
     
  6. Oct 27, 2016 #5

    A.T.

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  7. Oct 27, 2016 #6
  8. Oct 27, 2016 #7

    A.T.

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    Did you read the link I gave you?

    "The normal force is defined as the net force compressing two parallel surfaces together;..."

    What does negative compression mean?
     
  9. Oct 27, 2016 #8
    sorry I have very poor physics knowlege
     
  10. Oct 27, 2016 #9

    A.T.

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    Do you understand what "compressing" or "pressing" means? What is the opposite of that?
     
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