Stoping light or atleast slowing it down

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In summary, a discussion took place about a topic in PF-2.0 titled "HELP! How Did They Get Light To Stand Still?!" where a link was shared for more information. It was mentioned that a team from MIT was able to freeze light using the Bose-Einstein condensate. However, some clarification was made that they were only slowing down the group velocity of the wave, not the individual photons. The conversation also touched on how this does not contradict the theory of relativity.
  • #1
bleh
i can't remember where i read this but it was an artical about stoping light or atleast slowing it down i can't find anyother information on it and i was wondering if any of you knew where i could find some

thanks


bleh
 
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  • #2
I recall a Topic in PF-2.0 that was entitled: "HELP! How Did They Get Light To Stand Still?!", or words to that effect. I'll dig out my disk (which sounds really painfull, but I'll be OK) and see if that Topic contained a link.
 
  • #3
Just do a google search here Google Search: Stopping Light.

Are select one of the links below:
http://www.aip.org/mgr/png/2001/107.htm[/URL]
[PLAIN]http://www.sciencefriday.com/pages/2001/Jan/hour2_011901.html[/URL]
[URL=http://news.com.com/2100-1001-251260.html]Stopping light could lead to quantum advance in computing | CNET[/URL]
[PLAIN]http://www.ima.umn.edu/industrial/2001-2002/weinstein.html[/URL]
http://www.nature.com/cgi-taf/DynaPage.taf?file=/nature/journal/v409/n6819/full/409461a0_r.html
 
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  • #4
I remember reading an article in Scientific American magazine about some scientists slowing down a beam of light. I can't remember which issue it is exactly, but I know it was from a few months ago. :wink:
 
  • #5
Yes, in fact, there was a article in scientific american's Physics Special Edition. About how a team from MIT actually froze light (photons. Very clever.
 
  • #6
Didnt they use the Bose-Einstein condensate for that?
 
  • #7
I caN't believe it can be done. It's basically ignoring the theory of relativity, as it is based on the constant of the speed of light!

As far as I know, you can only change its frequency, like red-shift or blue-shift it, which is what gravitation does.
 
  • #8
You can also absorb it.
 
  • #9
Which is exactly what they did. They essentially froze the light's wave-front into a steady state of some atom condensate if I recall correctly.


And tails, Relativity says all observes in any reference frame will regard the speed of light in vacuum to be the same. Slowing down light by altering the medium in which it progresses is not contradicting relativity in any way, shape or form.
 
  • #10
Oh. So it's NOT slowing the light down really, is it...
 
  • #11
Right!

They're slowing the group velocity of the wave, not the individual photons.
 

1. How is it possible to stop or slow down light?

Stopping or slowing down light is possible through the use of specialized materials and techniques, such as using a Bose-Einstein condensate or passing light through a medium with a high refractive index. These methods can effectively slow down light to a fraction of its normal speed.

2. What are the potential applications of stopping or slowing down light?

The ability to stop or slow down light has various applications in fields such as telecommunications, quantum computing, and optical storage. It can also be used to create new materials with unique properties, such as superlenses and invisibility cloaks.

3. Can light be completely stopped?

No, it is not possible to completely stop light. According to Einstein's theory of relativity, nothing can travel faster than the speed of light. Therefore, light can only be slowed down to a certain extent, but not completely stopped.

4. How does stopping or slowing down light affect its properties?

When light is slowed down or stopped, its wavelength and frequency remain unchanged. However, its energy and momentum are affected, leading to changes in its behavior and interactions with matter.

5. Is stopping or slowing down light a recent discovery?

No, the concept of slowing down light has been around since the early 20th century, with various experiments and studies conducted to understand its behavior. However, advancements in technology and research have allowed scientists to achieve more precise and controlled methods of slowing down light in recent years.

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