Storage of Electromagnetic waves

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Is there any possibility of storage of electromagnetic waves ?

With regards

Nilesh.
 

Drakkith

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Yes, but not for the purposes of long-term energy storage. The intensity of the wave and the time frame you can keep it 'stored' is small due to unavoidable losses.
 
Yes, but not for the purposes of long-term energy storage. The intensity of the wave and the time frame you can keep it 'stored' is small due to unavoidable losses.
Thank you sir for your reply. Please explain "unavoidable losses".

With regards,,
Nilesh
 

Drakkith

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I'm not sure what to say. In any application where we use EM waves we have losses. There is no such thing as a perfect reflector, so any time an EM wave is reflected it loses energy.
 
I'm not sure what to say. In any application where we use EM waves we have losses. There is no such thing as a perfect reflector, so any time an EM wave is reflected it loses energy.
Thank your sir. That means we are still not concern about the losses of EM waves or why waves observed by something. If it is observed it might we retrieve ?

With regards
nilesh
 

Drakkith

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I'm sorry but I cannot understand your question.
 
I'm sorry but I cannot understand your question.
Sir, As you replied in any application where EM waves are used we have losses. My point why we have losses. If the losses are recoverable or not.

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Nilesh
 

Drakkith

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It's not that the losses aren't recoverable. Some of them actually are. It's that if you already have losses, then you're better off just converting the light into a form of energy that can be stored without those losses in the first place. It's MUCH easier and cheaper to convert light into heat, electrical, chemical, or another source of potential energy than to try to store the light directly.
 
It's not that the losses aren't recoverable. Some of them actually are. It's that if you already have losses, then you're better off just converting the light into a form of energy that can be stored without those losses in the first place. It's MUCH easier and cheaper to convert light into heat, electrical, chemical, or another source of potential energy than to try to store the light directly.
It's not that the losses aren't recoverable. Some of them actually are. It's that if you already have losses, then you're better off just converting the light into a form of energy that can be stored without those losses in the first place. It's MUCH easier and cheaper to convert light into heat, electrical, chemical, or another source of potential energy than to try to store the light directly.
Ok Sir. Could be store any of frequency from AM to Satellite - ( 530 kHz to 12 GHz)

With regards
Nilesh
 

Drakkith

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Sure, but only for a fraction of a second. That's how quickly you'll lose all of the energy if you don't convert the energy of the EM wave into something else that's easier to store.
 

sophiecentaur

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Ok Sir. Could be store any of frequency from AM to Satellite - ( 530 kHz to 12 GHz)

With regards
Nilesh
A wave is a 'dynamic' phenomenon. The only way to 'store a wave' is to keep it inside a cavity of some sort with reflective surfaces. Such a cavity would have surfaces with finite resistivity and that would cause power to be dissipated very quickly.
An example: If you lost as little as 1% at each reflection and the radiation were kept in a space between two curved mirrors, separated by 3m (a simple example), in a second, there would be 108 reflections, producing 0.99 to the power of 108. Your calculator will not show you enough zeros to tell you how much of the original energy would be left.
 
Sure, but only for a fraction of a second. That's how quickly you'll lose all of the energy if you don't convert the energy of the EM wave into something else that's easier to store.
Thank you sir.
 
A wave is a 'dynamic' phenomenon. The only way to 'store a wave' is to keep it inside a cavity of some sort with reflective surfaces. Such a cavity would have surfaces with finite resistivity and that would cause power to be dissipated very quickly.
An example: If you lost as little as 1% at each reflection and the radiation were kept in a space between two curved mirrors, separated by 3m (a simple example), in a second, there would be 108 reflections, producing 0.99 to the power of 108. Your calculator will not show you enough zeros to tell you how much of the original energy would be left.
Thank you sir.
 

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