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Strange Matter/Quark Star Matter/Strange Star Matter and Stranglets

  1. Aug 27, 2004 #1

    Mk

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  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 1, 2004 #2
    strange fusion

    a strange star would be hotter not cooler than a neutron star due to entropy
     
  4. Sep 1, 2004 #3
    I think this encyclopedia is not intended to scientists. It is intended to a large public, and as such it is precise enough. I also think it has not been written by non-scientists (at least not by experts/specialists) which result in :
    1 obviously they copied/past large parts, because they could not write everything by themselves and did not take time to reformulate. Some parts might be in there even though none of the co-authors precisely knows what they mean. Besides, one just has to compare with other encyclopedia to notice suspicious ressemblances.
    2 some statements look unprecise :
    This is strictly incorrect : when one refers to "nucleon" it is usually in a context where protons and neutrons are (approximatively) related by isospin and one is working at the nuclear scale or smaller. The fact that a neutron star is such a huge object has consequences on the correlations between the constituents. So many of the collected properties of the nucleon do not apply to the neutron star. Besides, once the neutron star is formed, what could be the role of protons ? (and thus what is the use of isospin symmetry ?). But the statement quoted above is correct enough for the non-specialist.
     
  5. Sep 1, 2004 #4
  6. Sep 1, 2004 #5

    Nereid

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    The identification of those two X-ray objects as 'strange stars' is far from secure ... not only is the theory of such stars still rather speculative (the physics of neutron stars surely still has some surprises; the physics of strange stars - if they are possible within existing theories at all - will likely need another decade to get the wrinkles ironed out), but the observations certainly aren't precise enough to require an object too small, hot/cold, and massive to be a neutron star (or black hole).
     
  7. Sep 2, 2004 #6

    Mk

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    What does the "Science Expert" mean, Nereid?
     
  8. Sep 2, 2004 #7

    Nereid

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    This thread - Medals, from Monday this week, may explain it better than I could.
     
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