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Homework Help: Strange problem.

  1. Oct 5, 2006 #1
    Can someone tell me how to do this problem? I Don't even know where to begin.
     

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  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 5, 2006 #2
  4. Oct 6, 2006 #3
    Begin with F=m*a.
    You should use that, and the fact that the resultant of that force and of m*g is along the normal to the surface in the equilibrium position.
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2006
  5. Oct 6, 2006 #4

    andrevdh

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    Homework Helper

    Consider a simpler problem first: The ball on block with a constant incline. Assume the block is accelerated towards the +x direction and that the ball is not moving vertically on the block.

    The ball will experience two forces: Its weight and a normal force coming from the incline [itex]W,\ N[/itex] . Assume the incline is at an angle [itex]\theta[/itex] w.r.t. the horizontal. What can you say that the acceleration will be given by in such a situation?
     
  6. Oct 7, 2006 #5

    andrevdh

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    Homework Helper

    Can you set up the force equations in the x- and y-directions using Newton's second law?

    That is: "The sum of the force components on an object in the x (or y) direction is equal to its mass times its acceleration in the x (or y) direction"
     
  7. Oct 10, 2006 #6
    Thanks for the help guys. I still couldn't get it, though. I'll give it another crack soon for test preparation.
     
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