String Theory: Mysterious Smaller Universes

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In summary, the conversation discusses the complexity of string theory and how it is not fully understood by anyone. It also touches on the idea of subatomic particles having their own universe, but concludes that this is not a valid theory. The conversation ends with the suggestion to stick with what is known about fundamental particles.
  • #1
Zeke
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ok i understand the string theroy but it seems that we just keep finding somthing smaller than what we said before could this be a theroy that every thing has its own universe thinking that they are the only universe
 
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  • #2
First, I can promise you that as an eigth grader, you don't understand string theory, just for the fact that NOBODY understands it. If they did, it would not be a theory, and we would all be excited and talking about how great it is, or we would be mad and talking about how big of a disappointment it was.

Second, subatomic particles don't think, they just do, or behave in it's own nature based on it's physical properties, if you will. So to think that atoms, or yet more fundamental subatomic particles "think they are in their own universe" is wrong.

I'd do a little more reading on the String Theory... :wink:
Paden Roder
 
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  • #3
Isn't it true of Eighth Graders too? Don't they just do and not think? Remember - Innocence is Ignorance and Ignorance is Bliss. Oh, to be young again!

As for fundamental particles ... there is no definitive proof that they don't think.
 
  • #4
There's no definitive proof either that they don't wear pink tutus and do the Dance of the Hours when we're not looking at them. Let's stick with extending what we do know about them.
 
  • #5
Originally posted by selfAdjoint
There's no definitive proof either that they don't wear pink tutus and do the Dance of the Hours when we're not looking at them. Let's stick with extending what we do know about them.

He's right. I mean, I could go on about how consciousness and thinking are macroscopic processes, as I've done before, but selfAdjoint's point is good enough. Basically, stick with Occam's Razor.
 
  • #6
I consider my blatherings hence curtailed.

Thanks for the wake-up call, you guys.
 
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1. What is string theory?

String theory is a theoretical framework in physics that attempts to explain the fundamental nature of the universe. It suggests that the smallest building blocks of the universe are not point-like particles, but tiny strings that vibrate at different frequencies, giving rise to the different particles and forces in the universe.

2. How does string theory propose the existence of smaller universes?

According to string theory, the universe we live in is made up of multiple dimensions beyond the three spatial dimensions we are familiar with. These additional dimensions are thought to be curled up and compact, creating tiny pockets of space that could potentially exist as separate universes.

3. How is string theory different from other theories of the universe?

Unlike other theories, such as general relativity and quantum mechanics, string theory attempts to unify all the fundamental forces of nature, including gravity. It also allows for the possibility of multiple universes and provides a way to reconcile the seemingly conflicting theories of relativity and quantum mechanics.

4. Is there any evidence to support string theory?

Currently, there is no direct evidence for string theory. It is still a theoretical framework that is being studied and refined by scientists. However, some of its predictions, such as the existence of gravitons and extra dimensions, have been supported by various experiments and observations.

5. How does string theory impact our understanding of the universe?

String theory has the potential to revolutionize our understanding of the universe and provide a more complete and comprehensive theory of everything. It has opened up new avenues of research and has sparked new ideas and concepts in physics. However, it is still a work in progress and requires further testing and development before it can be fully accepted as a complete theory of the universe.

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