Strong and Weak Electrolytes

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However, a solid ionic compound that only dissociates partially, such as 5%, is still considered a strong electrolyte. This is determined by the equilibrium constant for the dissolving reaction. The Vant Hoff factor further complicates this concept by stating that even though a substance consists entirely of ions, some will remain together as an ionic solid in solution due to the electrical attraction between them. This factor can affect the extent of dissociation and therefore the strength of the electrolyte. To fully understand this concept, it may be helpful to research the Vant Hoff factor.
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AcidRainLiTE
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I am slightly confused about the following statement from my chemistry book: "Note that essentially all solid ionic compounds are strong electrolytes in solution, because, no matter to what extent they dissolve, they give only ions" (https://www.amazon.com/dp/0030312914/?tag=pfamazon01-20). Isn't a strong electrolyte something that dissociates completely or almost completely into ions?
A solid ionic compound that dissociates only say, 5% into ions is still considered a strong electrolyte?
That seems to me to be a weak electrolyte ("Weak electrolytes are those electrolytes which in water solutions dissociate only partially, giving ions and which are in equilibrium with undissociated molecules "(http://www.ktf-split.hr/glossary/en_o.php?def=weak electrolyte"))
Thanks.
 
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Well that statement, in my opinion, answers half the question. Basically something is a strong electrolyte yes if it dissociates to a large extent, determined by the equilibrium constant for the disolving reaction. However there's also something called the Vant Hoff factor which complicates things. This basicallt says that even though something consists entirely of ions, some will remain together as an ionic solid in solution because the electrical attraction of the two ions will overcome the forces applied by the water trying to pull them apart. So for a reaction you might have a VHF of i = 1 which means that the solution is completely ionic and dissociates completely etc.

Dunno if this helps, might be wrong but look up the Vant hoff thing, it might answer your question. if it doesnt, sorry :P

-G
 
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I can understand your confusion about the statement from your chemistry book. The term "strong electrolyte" is often used to describe a substance that dissociates completely or almost completely into ions in solution. However, in the context of solid ionic compounds, the term is used differently.

In a solid ionic compound, the ions are held together by strong electrostatic forces, making it difficult for them to break apart and dissociate in solution. Therefore, even if only a small percentage of the compound dissociates into ions, it is still considered a strong electrolyte because it is able to produce ions in solution.

On the other hand, weak electrolytes are substances that only partially dissociate into ions in solution. This means that there is a significant portion of the compound that remains in its undissociated form.

So, in the case of solid ionic compounds, the term "strong electrolyte" is used to describe its ability to produce ions in solution, rather than the degree of dissociation. I hope this clarifies the confusion and helps you understand the concept better.
 

1. What is the difference between a strong and weak electrolyte?

A strong electrolyte is a substance that completely dissociates into ions when in solution, while a weak electrolyte only partially dissociates. This means that a strong electrolyte conducts electricity more efficiently than a weak electrolyte.

2. How can I determine if a substance is a strong or weak electrolyte?

One way to determine if a substance is a strong or weak electrolyte is by conducting a conductivity test. A strong electrolyte will have a higher conductivity, indicating a higher concentration of ions in solution.

3. What are some examples of strong electrolytes?

Common examples of strong electrolytes include strong acids, such as hydrochloric acid (HCl) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4), and strong bases, such as sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and potassium hydroxide (KOH).

4. Are all ionic compounds considered strong electrolytes?

No, not all ionic compounds are considered strong electrolytes. Some ionic compounds, such as sodium chloride (NaCl), are strong electrolytes because they completely dissociate in water. However, others, like calcium carbonate (CaCO3), are considered weak electrolytes because they only partially dissociate.

5. How do strong and weak electrolytes affect the pH of a solution?

Strong electrolytes can significantly affect the pH of a solution because they completely dissociate into ions, which can either release or consume hydrogen ions (H+) in solution. Weak electrolytes, on the other hand, have a smaller impact on pH because they only partially dissociate.

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