Summation notation

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  • #1
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Main Question or Discussion Point

I know this should be easy and the answer will be glaringly obvious in hindsight but my brain is fried and I can't for the life of me figure this out. My problem is this I have a function as follows;

V = [tex]\sum\lambda[/tex]i,j,k hihjhk (summation over i,j,k where i,j,k = 1,2,3)

I cant work out if this is

V = [tex]\lambda[/tex]1,1,1h13 + [tex]\lambda[/tex]1,1,2h12h2 + ... + [tex]\lambda[/tex]2,3,1h2h3h1 +...

with every permutation of 1, 2 and 3, this should be simple as it is taken as a given in my problem but it is driving me insane.
 
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Answers and Replies

  • #2
HallsofIvy
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Yes, what you have so far is correct. And, since there are 3 indices and each can take on 3 values, there will be [itex]3^3= 27[/itex] terms in the sum.
It would help to have a "process" for working through them- I recommend changing the last index through 1, 2, 3, then the next, etc.- just like an odometer turns over in a car.

i,j,k= 1,1,1; 1,1,2; 1,1,3; 1,2,1;1,2,2; 1,2,3; 1,3,1; 1,3,2; 1,3,3;
will be the first 9 terms.
The next 9 will be exactly the same but with first number 2 and the last 9 with first number 3.
 
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  • #3
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Thank you, you may just have rescued my mental health
 

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