Sun radiation

  • Thread starter Bassalisk
  • Start date
  • #1
948
2
Lets take this specific example:


Sun is radiating heat and a water tank with a certain surface area S absorbs this heat.

Sun rays are perpendicular to this tank.

[PLAIN]http://pokit.etf.ba/get/778c2978a453178481d142a891ae07c5.jpg [Broken]


If I know much energy did my tank of water absorbed in certain amount of time(Power), through Stefan-Boltzmann's Law, could I calculate the temperature of the sun?

Thanks
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Answers and Replies

  • #3
948
2
Yea I see what he did there. But I have to solve this problem. Is my assumption right?

Full problem is here:
https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=497347

but since nobody was answering it for a day, I figured why not try to break it into small parts and then try to solve it...

I am stuck and I need an answer fast.
 
  • #4
403
36
I did not respond to the other strand because the answer is not evident to me, but perhaps I can spark some insight.

Do you see in the original problem that you can calculate the number of calories that went into the water? And, with the time and area, the flux?

Based on what you've said, I think you do.

Can you assume in the problem that you know the distance to the sun? Do you see any way to use that and the inverse square law of light intensity to find the flux at the suns surface?
 
Last edited:
  • #5
948
2
I did not respond to the other strand because the answer is not evident to me, but perhaps I can spark some insight.

Do you see in the original problem that you can calculate the number of calories that went into the water? And, with the time and area, the flux?
How can I calculate those calories when the c, constant of thermal conduction is not given...
 
  • #6
403
36
I see it was not given, but I don't know the context of the problem. Do you think you are permitted to use a physical constant like the specific heat of water? Was it introduce in the course previously, perhaps in the definition of the calorie?
 
  • #7
948
2
I see it was not given, but I don't know the context of the problem. Do you think you are permitted to use a physical constant like the specific heat of water? Was it introduce in the course previously, perhaps in the definition of the calorie?
They are always giving us everything we need to solve a problem. I am not overruling that they forgot, but usually we don't use that table.

I will let you know, tomorrow I will find out an answer.
 
  • #8
403
36
They are always giving us everything we need to solve a problem. I am not overruling that they forgot, but usually we don't use that table.

I will let you know, tomorrow I will find out an answer.
I'd appreciate that. Looking back at the problem, I don't you can possibly do anything without know that one calorie raises the temperature of one gram of water by 1ºC.
 

Related Threads on Sun radiation

  • Last Post
Replies
8
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
6
Views
4K
  • Last Post
Replies
6
Views
3K
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
20
Views
344
Replies
14
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
8
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
2
Views
944
  • Last Post
Replies
2
Views
843
  • Last Post
Replies
17
Views
3K
Top