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Automotive Super efficient engine design

  1. May 29, 2012 #1
    Hi i would like to post for discussion my design of a new type internal combustion engine Please post your comments.The following information is to explain the description and operation.

    In drawing #1
    The engine has three heavy pistons all attached together; two small and one large one in the middle. The large one is just for mass and as an air pump. The pistons are housed inside the three light weight aluminum cylinders. The pistons are free to move back and forth compressing and then firing on one end.As the piston on the other end opens a port, it allows the compressed air from the large center piston to purge and exhaust through an exhaust valve for that cylinder. The cycle repeats compressing and firing on each end as the opposite end exhausts. There would be check or reed valves in the large cylinder to take in air, and there would be a mechanical operated exhaust valve, and mechanical or electric injector in each cylinder head. There is no clearance between the piston and head so the piston can compress as much as it wants to until it stops, then it fires sending the pistons back.

    In drawing#2
    The pistons and cylinders are mounted in a light weight frame, on lineal bearings and allow for back and forth movement with two rack gears attached to the one end of the engine cylinder head. The lineal rack gears make contact with two sprag clutch gears (that means like a one way gear that drives going forward in turns freely in reverse). These gears
    transfer the work force to an output shaft. The output shaft has a flywheel to maintain constant inertia of the heavy pistons and cylinders moving back and forth.
    In drawing #3
    This drawing is a end view of the engine attached to the rack gears, top and bottom, driving the two sprag clutch gears that are connected to the output shaft and flywheel turning in one direction. The top rack gear on the right drives one sprag gear and output shaft and the bottom rack gear drives the other sprag gear and output shaft in the same direction. The output shaft is mounted stationary as the engine and rack gear goes back and forth driving the shaft
    producing a work force.

    I will attach drawing as a post as they will not all fit.

    Thanks Bob
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 29, 2012 #2

    Ranger Mike

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    Re: super effichient engine design

    dont see any drawings, bob
     
  4. May 29, 2012 #3
    Re: super effichient engine design

    Sorry I'm having problems uploaded the attachments (pictures).I will get back later.
    Thanks Bob
     
  5. May 30, 2012 #4

    berkeman

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    Re: super effichient engine design

    Welcome to the PF, Bob.

    What makes you say that your engine is "super efficient"? What thermodynamic advantages do you claim over conventional internal combustion engines (ICEs)?
     
  6. May 30, 2012 #5
    Thanks for the reply my engine has four power strokes per cycle and It always fires 90 degrees to the crank. most (ICEs) fires one power stroke every forth cycle and then at (TDC).
    I don't much about thermodynamics but do know they (ICEs) are only about 20% efficient
    for the last 150 years I think it is time to change the design.Still working on trying to reduce my PDF files for the drawings.

    Bob
     
  7. May 30, 2012 #6
    Here is drawing #1 will try two more.
    Bob
     

    Attached Files:

  8. May 30, 2012 #7

    Danger

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    Okay, that actually downloaded a file to my computer. I don't like that, but I'll tolerate it.
    Bob, may I assume that you are pre-high-school? I ask only because your drawing is very reminiscent of things that I put on paper when I was about 12-14 years old. If so, your initiative is admirable.
    One thing that is noticeably absent from your drawing, however, is a method of transferring the reciprocal motion to a rotary one in order to drive a vehicle. You have an apparently useless huge piston right where the crankshaft should be. This confuses me.
     
  9. May 30, 2012 #8
    Danger maybe you are smart enough or are you to tell me y all internal combustion engine are only about 20% efficient i believe it is because of the crank?? when the piston is at top dead center and it fires all the energy has no place to go but in to heat,and then when the crank moves down, and gains a mechanical advantage, the pressure has dropped in the cylinder. I believe my engine will be super efficient. Here are the last two attachments. look at them and If you have any more questions feel free.Looking froward to your answer about the efficiency

    Bob
     

    Attached Files:

  10. May 30, 2012 #9

    russ_watters

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    Car engines are about 30% efficient and the reason is buried pretty deep in thermodynamics. I'm afraid without digging into thermo, you have no basis for any performance claim for your desing.
     
  11. May 30, 2012 #10

    Danger

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    I made the mistake of looking at the first one, and I urge others to not bother. It once again caused an unwanted download. Not only that, but every time that I tried to exit the damned thing, it downloaded again. There are now 6 copies of it on my computer, but be assured that I'm going to delete them soon. The drawing itself was absolutely useless. It shows nothing other than a possible reciprocating rack-and-pinion arrangement. There are no descriptions, dimensions, details, etc..
     
  12. May 31, 2012 #11
    Hi Russ your right 20% is probable a low number with modern day technology, and thermodynamics is important but i base my claim on tests from models years ago and i have answers for any question. It only makes sense that 4 power in one cycle is better then 1 in four and 90% is better then 0% to the crank do you agree.
    Thanks Bob
     
  13. May 31, 2012 #12

    brewnog

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    Can I see your test data please?
     
  14. May 31, 2012 #13
    I will go back about 19 years to when I was experimenting with #1 the Phenomena of centrifugal force, precession of a gyro, and action reaction, in an effort to produce motion without friction or traction ( in other words to make two counter rotating flywheels and or swinging arms to move in a forward direction without any thing to push on) and #2 with magnets to try to achieve perpetual motion. All attempts failed, but as a result the test model i made with counter rotating arms seem to be super efficient running off air pressure cycling and moving back and forth on a work bench and doing work that really got the brain cells working so a couple of engineer friends got real interested and we hooked the counter rotating test model up to a computer and a lot of test equipment including a oscilloscope and logged all the (timing,air pressure, air flow, forces,acceleration) and recorded on a floppy disc to document the efficiency data. It was way over my head but the efficiency was impressive I shut off the air at the tank and the test model just kept on going and going on just the air in the hose. I went to work thinking drawing and designing until I came up with a design for a recuperating combustion engine that could be fired with about anything. I decided to submit it to the US department of commerce national institute standards technology to try for a grant to build a test model. I guess the information I sent them was to complicated to understand and was denied the grant. I was pretty depressed, so I
    shelved the idea until recently i never got the info back.
    Bob
     
  15. May 31, 2012 #14

    berkeman

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    And all of this is why we are asking for test data to support your claims of high efficiency. We deal in science here at the PF, and claims of unusually high efficiencies need to be backed up by experimental data.
     
  16. May 31, 2012 #15
    It is a fact that it takes as much energy or force to stop a mass in motion, as to start it moving again. If that energy or force drives a shaft at a total mechanical advantage at 90 degrees is that not more efficient? If the heavy pistons push against the cylinders back and forth through compression and combustion, four times per cycle and the cylinder is attached to the gears that drive the shaft, would this not be more efficient ?
    I would like to talk more about of the technical issues on building a test model.
    Bob
     
  17. Jun 1, 2012 #16

    brewnog

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    The angle your pistons push your crank with has little to do with efficiency.

    Can we see your test data please?
     
  18. Jun 1, 2012 #17
    Confusing power density with efficiency.
     
  19. Jun 1, 2012 #18
    Try putting your elbow on the table with your palm up and dropping a bowling ball from the ceiling on to your palm, and then rethink your statement. The pressure in a combustion chamber at (TDC) is about 2000 psi it has been tested and just like when the ball hits your palm. Then move your elbow off to the side of table and catch the ball again that is like 90 degrees to the crank. Then you can see your own test data. I can only give the test data when engine is built.
    Bob
     
  20. Jun 1, 2012 #19
    Could you please expand on your statement? It makes no sense to me.
    Bob
     
  21. Jun 1, 2012 #20

    brewnog

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    The bowling ball might apply more torque to your elbow at 90 degrees, but this has nothing to do with efficiency, and does nothing to support your claim.

    I don't like people throwing around credentials, but you should understand that there are experts here. I am a professional engineer and have spent the last seven years developing internal combustion engines. I analyse data (or predictive data) to make judgements on efficiency and this is the only way to make progress.

    In an earlier post you said that you base your claims on earlier tests. For the third and final time, please share this data.

     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2012
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