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Superconductivity in space?

  1. Jul 8, 2007 #1
    Have there been any observed instances of superconducting phenomena in outer space? It sure is cold enough for many substances to superconduct.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 9, 2007 #2
    Qgp

    I imagine that the ordered sort of structures ( crystaline ) that you need to get electrical superconductivity are not present in bulk out there in outer space.


    there is a phase of the quark gluon plasma that is color superconducting,

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Color_superconductivity

    this state of matter would only have existed at very early times in the universe or in collapsed star cores. Im not an expert on nuclear physics so i dont know how solid this prediction is , but .... then again this isnt really electrical superconductivity either.
     
  4. Jul 10, 2007 #3
    Would superconductivity be more likely to occur in superdense environments like the metallic hydrogen of Jupiter's core?
     
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