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Supercritical water reactor

  1. Mar 5, 2010 #1
    Hi there,

    I want to know about SCWR(supercritical water reactor) that is a Gen IV reactor.
    Has any body introduce the technology of SCWR & SSCWR.

    thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 5, 2010 #2

    Astronuc

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    Staff: Mentor

    Re: Scwr

    The Gen IV concepts are still in the design phase. None has been built.

    http://www.gen-4.org/Technology/systems/scwr.htm [Broken]

    Putting this in perspective, PWRs operate with pressure ~15.5-15.7 MPa and Tout ~310-330°C (590-626°F). BWR cores operate under saturated conditions at ~7.2 MPa and ~286°C (547°F). The exit temperature of a BWR is approximately (or slightly less than) the inlet temperature of a PWR.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  4. Mar 5, 2010 #3
    Re: Scwr

    thanks Astronuc,
    can you explain about neutronic calculations and the used codes for SCWR?
    Whether the existing codes can be used for this type of reactor is?
     
  5. Mar 6, 2010 #4

    Astronuc

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    Re: Scwr

    I would imagine that one could MCNP.

    One needs something beyond two group diffusion theory, and probably a multi-group transport code. I'll see what I can find.
     
  6. Mar 7, 2010 #5
    Re: Scwr

    Someone please correct me if I'm wrong, but SCWR would behave similar to most other reactors from a neutronics standpoint. The only difference that I see is due to the increased temperatures thermal expansion of core components and Doppler shifting effects may result in different behavior at temperature compared to cool. Presumably, this would not be an insurmountable modeling challenge.
     
  7. Mar 7, 2010 #6

    Astronuc

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    Re: Scwr

    Apparently there is a fast spectrum version of the SCWR, but perhaps it depends on the fuel-to-moderator ratio. There are square and hexagonal lattice designs.

    Neutronically, it seems similar to a BWR, but the moderator temperature is much higher. I expect the resonance broadening to be more of an effect than for a conventional (lower temperature) LWR.

    Different groups have used MCNP (coupled with ORIGEN2 for isotopic/depletion calcs) versions or HELIOS. HELIOS has the capability of hexagonal lattices. There is an effort to couple MCNP with a thermal-hydraulics code because of the significant temperature rise and property changes across the core.

    Some examples:

    Coupled neutronics and thermohydraulics calculations with burn-up for HPLWRs


    They use an MCNP module


    Materials for high performance light water reactors

    A Korean group has used Helios.


    Michael Z. Podowski, Thermal-Hydraulic Aspects of SCWR Design
    http://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/jpes/2/1/352/_pdf [Broken]

    ANNUAL REPORT EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
    http://www.osti.gov/bridge/servlets/purl/829883-ujDbxh/native/829883.pdf


    http://www.inl.gov/technicalpublications/Documents/2699828.pdf [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  8. Feb 15, 2011 #7
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 25, 2017
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