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Superpostion theorem

  1. Jun 9, 2014 #1
    I'm trying solve this scheme:

    attachment.php?attachmentid=70441&stc=1&d=1402248289.png

    but not with the ideia of solve it but yes with the ideia of understand the dynamic of the thing...

    aftwer watch this video:


    and read about the superposition:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superposition_theorem

    I did this scheme for solve the problem:
    attachment.php?attachmentid=70470&stc=1&d=1402348364.png
    attachment.php?attachmentid=70471&stc=1&d=1402348364.png

    But, and now, how make the graphical superposition?
     

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    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 25, 2014
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 9, 2014 #2
    Why did you start a second thread about the same problem?
     
  4. Jun 10, 2014 #3
    The *same example*, but *different questions*. Here I'm asking about how to construct the equivalent superpostion from of two given. Can you help me?
     
  5. Jun 10, 2014 #4

    Born2bwire

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    Do what it says in Wikipedia. Replace all but one of the voltage sources with a short. Solve for the case of the solitary source. Repeat for the other source and then add the solutions together.
     
  6. Jun 10, 2014 #5
    My friend, is not possbile to solve this problem cause it haven't none numerical value, the better interpretation possible is the which I drew and I'm asking how would the union those two drawings.
     
  7. Jun 10, 2014 #6

    Born2bwire

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    I have no idea what those drawings are trying to represent but any talk of their "union" is nonsensical. The circuit does not need numerical values to analyze. One could solve it explicitly for the unknown variables as messy as that would be. Actually, after a quick glance it is a simpler matter. In the first case, removing the source between BD results in shorting out R5 and R4, leaving you with a simple circuit of three resistors. Regretfully, the second case does not reduce the number of unknowns but it is a matter of bookkeeping.
     
  8. Jun 10, 2014 #7
    You don't have ideia because you didn't watch the video... I don't want to solve the system, what I want is apply graphically the superposition principle!
     

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  9. Jun 11, 2014 #8

    Born2bwire

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    This isn't useful. You do not know the nodal voltages without solving the circuit. Heck, there is no reason why you can't have negative voltages too. As such, you have no way of knowing what the relative voltage "heights" are. There is no point in using this representation outside of trying to explain voltage with the classic pressure analogy.
     
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