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Surface area of atomized molecules?

  1. Nov 26, 2004 #1
    I have the following problem, which seems easy, I just cannot get my brain around it....

    Assume that [tex]30.0 cm^3[/tex] of gasoline is atomized into N spherical droplets, each with a radius of [tex]2.00\times 10^{-5} m[/tex]. What is the total surface area of these N spherical droplets?

    How do I find the number of gasoline molecules in a given amount of liquid, when I have the size of the radius??

    Thank you
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 26, 2004 #2

    Tide

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    You know the radius of each drop so you can calculate the volume of each drop. You also know the total volume of N drops. Therefore ... ! :-)
     
  4. Nov 26, 2004 #3
    I though I would need the density or the mole number for gasoline in order to get an accurate number. Which was not given.

    Thank you!
     
  5. Nov 26, 2004 #4

    Tide

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    They are only asking for the surface area - you don't need to find the number of molecules. "Atomize" does NOT mean you separate the liquid into its atomic parts. It just means you break it up into small droplets!
     
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