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Swearing in front of kids

  1. Jun 5, 2007 #1
    Ok, just wanted to know what you think.

    Are you against swearing?
    Are you against swearing in front of children?

    Particularly if No and then Yes, Why?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 5, 2007 #2

    DaveC426913

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    I dislike swearing (though that makes me a hypocrite, since I do).

    I strongly frown upon swearing in front of children.


    The reason for behaving ourselves in front of children is because it is all our responsibilities to set a good example - in all things, not just swearing.
     
  4. Jun 5, 2007 #3
    Ok, yeah, setting a good example. I really dislike swearing as well.

    I don't think that makes you a hypocrite, many people do things that they think are wrong or dislike. Even if you were to tell others not to swear, and carried on swearing, that would also not be hypocritical. As long as you still believed that swearing was a bad thing. A hypocrite, is probably someone who is deceiving others by intentionally claiming something even though they themselves don't believe it or adhere (mentally) to it. Thats my definition...

    It becomes a good reason not to swear in front of children. However if someone is asked not to swear, they generally retaliate quite badly. Maybe just the concept of being asked to change ourselves makes us feel like we would then be doing for that person; rather than ourselves. I dunno...
     
  5. Jun 5, 2007 #4

    DaveC426913

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    Depends on how mature they are and how reasonable the request. Societal manners deteriorate as personal rights come to the fore.
     
  6. Jun 5, 2007 #5

    Astronuc

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    Not a hypocrite, just human. I dislike swearing, but when I get pissed off I'll use a few choice words, but hopefully under my breath and out of earshot of others.

    Same here.


    Agree. It is a matter of self-control (maintaining one's composure) and setting a good example.

    My daughter swears when she gets angry (usually at me), but I try to remain calm and in control.

    I don't believe my son swears - at least I've never heard him.
     
  7. Jun 5, 2007 #6
    I swear like a sailor. There's something about being trapped on a ship with 3000 other guys that makes that kind of behaviour common. I've tamed my language a bit, but mostly because it's not appropriate in many cases outside the military.

    I remember when I came home on leave and accidentally swore in front of my mother. I was a bit shocked at myself, but she didn't pay any attention to it. I realized how much difference the environment I am in influences the way I speak.

    I'm averse to swearing in most company that I'm not familiar with, particularly women and children. I'll swear around a man if I know him slightly, a woman if I know her well, and never around a child. The first two only because I don't want to seem too offensive. I wouldn't swear in front of a child because it wouldn't seem appropriate to me for a child to swear in front of an adult, and I wouldn't want to encourage that behaviour. I don't particularly care if children know the words or swear among their friends, but I think it is very important for them to learn that type of language is only acceptable among their peers.

    Haha, You should have heard the conversation I had at work last night. I spent most of the weekend watching George Romero flicks. Somehow the conversation at work turned into making a movie about zombies invading nude beaches. There were quite a few colorful metaphors thrown around.
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2007
  8. Jun 5, 2007 #7

    baywax

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    Mother's favorite saying is "**** 'em if they can't take a joke."

    If you want you're kids to be prepared for life teach them swear words along with the other not so nice bits about being an animal also known as a "human" among humans. The more familiar they are with swearing the less taboo it will seem. The more common place something is the less importance is holds. The less importance something has, the less it is noticed or held up as a tool for recognition. Of course, I don't mean kids that are in daycare or kindergarten or up to about grade 5. I mean, kids that are at a maturity level where they've learned that swearing is unacceptable to some people and are at an age where they can respect the wishes of other people. Of course, you'll be hard pressed to find many adults, let alone children, who have cultivated or learned that kind of respect for others.
     
  9. Jun 5, 2007 #8

    Astronuc

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    Court Rebuffs F.C.C. on Fines for Indecency
    http://www.nytimes.com/2007/06/05/business/media/05decency.html
    :rofl: :rolleyes: My children are aware the Bush and Cheney represent poor examples.

    I don't even like movies with swearing so I avoid them.
     
  10. Jun 5, 2007 #9

    Evo

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    Children are going to hear swear words. I remember something someone said once that swearing is only bad if you don't have the vocabulary to choose other words. I swear all the time, but at least I know other words. :biggrin:
     
  11. Jun 5, 2007 #10

    baywax

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    I tend to agree. When sensationalism demands the use of vulgarity, I don't support it. However, cultures that use swearing as a part of their colloquial heritage and are portrayed on film are sometimes worth knowing about. For instance, Pulp Fiction portrays something of that sort. However, if you've seen Saturday Night Fever or Grease, the absence of swearing in these scripts makes these films unbelieveable, fairytale like and 2 dimensional. I think the Shrek movies has more implied swearing in it than these films. The Lords of Flatbush or Good Will Hunting would be just as flat as Saturday Night Fever without the use of good old American vulgar colloquialisms.
     
  12. Jun 5, 2007 #11

    DaveC426913

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    Watching Scarface would be a markedly different experience.

    Apparently the count for the F-bomb is over 170 - that's well over 1 per minute.
     
  13. Jun 5, 2007 #12
    Swearing is one of the most ridiculous phenomena I have ever come across. The idea that some combination of sounds is intrinsically damaging or insulting to people is very strange. Words like **** (the f word) is considered 'bad' and words like 'dog' is not. The sounds made when pronouncing them are quite similar.

    Apart from that, the only reason that the words used when swearing is considered 'bad' is because we have agreed that it is. They have also shifted over time. Using terms like 'chicken breasts' where probably really offensive say a century ago. A lot of them have their origin from religious taboo. In a sense, language is a stronger dogma that most things in society.

    The most hilarious attempt to combat swearing is to try to make people use other words when expressing certain strong emotions. Over time, they will most likely be the 'new' words used when swearing. Instead of trying to make people switch words as moral language police, we could try to tackle the things that make people swear in the first place.
     
  14. Jun 5, 2007 #13
    "Boobs" is a funny word. I get the feeling that word was invented as a joke. Like some smart-ass said to his friends, "Hey, guys let's go around calling breasts 'boobs', then sooner or later people will use this ridiculous word as if it is normal."

    Concerning swearing in front of kids. I wouldn't swear in front of someone else's kids because every parent has their own set of guidelines for raising their children, and I don't want to accidentally interfere with the way someone else might be raising their kids. If I had kids, I would probably swear in front of them occassionally, not intentionally, but I wouldn't go out of my way to censor myself so it would happen from time to time.

    Let's get to the heart of this question. Why are you concerned with swearing in front of kids? Is it because you think they should have a "proper" upbringing in a "proper" environment, or is it that you don't trust kids to not repeat what they hear at an inappropriate time? Would you swear in front of a full-grown adult who suffered from a mental affliction such that he or she had the "mind of a child"?
     
  15. Jun 5, 2007 #14

    baywax

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    You get these stories about kids from 2 to 4 years old swearing in daycare. They don't know what it means or anything about the words they're using but they've heard it in dad's garage or when mom strips the plumbing with a pipe wrench and they repeat it in times that seem as stressful to them. Who is it hurting? The daycare worker? The other kids? Is it spreading the "disease of vulgarity"? Not really. But, it does hurt anyone who thinks the words are hurtful. And, just like we don't behave in ways that are not acceptable to people who don't know us, we tend to restrict our verbal behavior out of respect of what may be going on in another person's head. So, concerning children and swearing in front of them: if we restrict our verbage we lessen the chance of our kids offending someone we or they don't know. This way, the child is spared rejection and scrutiny where they might otherwise be subjected to it because of their "foul language". For **** sake they might even be spared a regimen of Ritalin or worse.
     
  16. Jun 5, 2007 #15
    That depends on the adult, his mental condition and the circumstances. I would probably take a few extra moments to weigh the situation in the case of someone with a mental affliction. Primarily I would be concerned that the person has enough reasoning to know when swearing is appropriate. If I hear them swearing at innapropriate times, and in an insulting behaviour, I would not swear in their presence. It really depends on the extent of their mental affliction. Otherwise, if it makes them comfortable to swear in my presence, I'm all for it.

    I could curse up a storm with someone with tourrettes syndrome. That would be an interesting challenge I could have fun with.
     
  17. Jun 5, 2007 #16

    turbo

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    Like the little kid in "A Christmas Story", my father had taken cursing to a high art and I had been exposed to it regularly, though with my strict Catholic upbringing, I learned what I could and could not say without problems. One big problem happened about at age 6 when my great uncle Marcel had been released from a TB sanitarium. He had contracted TB during WWII and he I had been swapping letters since I was about 4 or so - I learned to write early and he had the patience and the time to deal with responding to a barely literate kid, and send me stamps from all over the world that he gathered from his fellow inmates. He had used his pay to buy a Buick convertible (this was in the '50's) and had promised to stop in and take me for a ride. A few days before he came back to Maine, I was downtown with my dad and a fellow charged across the street and hugged my dad calling him "you old peckerhead", and he went into a local general store and bought me a pop-gun before we went into the only tavern for a few drinks (mine were root-beers). When Uncle Marcel pulled up in his Buick, I ran out to his car hollering "Uncle Marcel, you old peckerhead!" Mom was flabbergasted and didn't know what to do, but Uncle Marcel came to my rescue with a smile and a gentle admonition to my mother that kids don't always know what they're saying. Years later, he told me how much fun he had that day and how funny the situation was.
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2007
  18. Jun 5, 2007 #17

    chroot

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    In the grand list of human behaviors that concern me, torture and genocide are near the top. Swearing in front of children ranks nearly last, right above men wearing ladies' panties in their bedrooms.

    Who really cares? Having a definite potty mouth will offend some people with weak sensibilities, so you should probably discourage your kids from swearing like sailors. At the same time, your kids are going to hear the words everywhere, so it's a pretty stupid waste of your time to somehow try to shelter them from such words completely.

    - Warren
     
  19. Jun 5, 2007 #18
    Was this thread initiated in response to the court ruling in favor of Nicole Ritchie at the dismay of the FCC?
     
  20. Jun 5, 2007 #19
    I found the Penn and Teller episode on profanity to be very good. Their main conclusion is that censorship isn't telling you to be a nicer person and be kinder to people, their just telling you to be nasty with nicer language.

    In other words, don't stop beating people up, just smile while you do it.

    http://video.glath.com/view/bull****.Profanity

    (you have to replace the **** with the word s h i t)
     
  21. Jun 5, 2007 #20

    baywax

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    Excellent story!:rofl: My dad was a tank commander in WWII and came back after 6 years with Black Lung from the diesil and gun powder smoke in the confines of his tank.He got out of his infirmary long before I was born but his favorite way to repremand his kids was to call us "meatheads" (except for the daughters). Being extremely well brought up by his dad who was an Army Surgeon during WWI crippled his ability to swear with any conviction. It was almost comical, once I knew how to swear, to hear him try to put **** and **** in the same sentence. As his adult son I was able to help him along with "proper" swearing.
     
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