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Sweet potaters!

  1. May 15, 2005 #1

    Math Is Hard

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    My market sells these individual potatoes and sweet potatoes wrapped (sealed) in plastic. They're called Micro-Bakers. Have you seen these? The label says "Oven Baked Taste - right from the microwave."
    I am curious if this plastic wrap really makes any difference in the way it tastes or how fast it cooks. To me they taste the same as if I cook one without the wrap, but they do appear to cook faster. (Of course, this might be just because their potatoes are slightly smaller than what I usually buy.)
     
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  3. May 15, 2005 #2
    I usually wrap my food in plastic when I put it in the microwave. The microwave tends to heat unevenly and if I don't put plastic over the food some parts are overcooked and others aren't cooked enough. I think the plastic keeps all the moisture inside the food and disperses the heat faster prviding more even cooking and prevents that nasty dry taste that microwaved food can have.
     
  4. May 15, 2005 #3

    Danger

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    Potatoes are properly cooked the same way as hot dogs. Stick a nail in each end, hook one strand of a lamp cord to each one, and plug it in. (Cooking times might vary in Europe.)
     
  5. May 15, 2005 #4

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    hmm..I guess even-heating and moisture preservation is the advantage then. I could just do it myself and wrap regular potatoes in saran wrap since there's probably nothing special about the plastic they use.

    I'm such a sucker for gimmicks in the grocery store. I have to try everything new. I'm also into those "grapples" now - grape-flavored apples. They're pretty good I think.
     
  6. May 15, 2005 #5

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    My physics teacher electrocuted a hotdog for a class demonstration once. Every time I smell hotdogs cooking now I think of physics class! :biggrin:
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2005
  7. May 15, 2005 #6
    Wrapping stuff before you put it in the microwave also prevents all that nasty splatter. That stuff is the second hardest substance in the world. The worst is the junk on the bottom of the oven.

    I've seen microwaves that look worse than gas station men's rooms. No way would I put my food in either of those places.
     
  8. May 15, 2005 #7

    Moonbear

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    When I was a kid, we had a hot dog zapper (well, that was my name for it). It was a plastic box with a row of metal spikes on either side. You took a package of hotdogs and impaled each one on a set of spikes, then plugged it in. I guess it was a tad safer than Danger's version. I still didn't like the hotdogs, but I was much more willing to help cook them when we got that thing. :biggrin:

    As for the plastic wrapped sweet potatoes, I never read the package or anything and couldn't figure out what made them more ready to cook than the non-plastic wrapped ones. I don't think I'd cook them in sealed wrap...wouldn't the steam build up and explode the wrapping?
     
  9. May 15, 2005 #8

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    That was a concern I had, but I haven't exploded one yet. Usually when I nuke unwrapped potatoes I punch holes in them with a fork first, but there is no recommendation to puncture either the seal or the potato with these micro-bakers.
     
  10. May 16, 2005 #9
    I like to add a little butter, then sprinkle them with nutmeg and toasted pecan bits. Ground ginger is good on them too.
     
  11. May 16, 2005 #10

    Danger

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    You get just a little weirder every day. :tongue:
     
  12. May 16, 2005 #11

    Moonbear

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    Yep, that's what I do too, stab them with a fork before nuking them. Maybe that's not really necessary? Those were the instructions for potatoes ages ago when we got our first microwave, so I've always done it that way under the assumption that they'd explode if I didn't.
     
  13. May 16, 2005 #12
    LOL - this reminds me of a movie I really enjoyed, 'Benny and Joon' ( http://images.amazon.com/images/P/B000053VAZ.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpg ) with Johnny Depp; they have a great way of cooking mashed potatoes and toasted cheese :smile: (my style of cooking :bugeye: )
     
  14. May 16, 2005 #13
    I caught a glimpse of the title of this thread while scrolling and thought I had just read "the sweet potato eaters." I wondered if they'd found a lost van Gogh.
     
  15. May 16, 2005 #14
    You should use waxpaper instead of plastic wrap. A young girl did an experiment for a science fair and she discovered that plastic releases molecules when heated and these mix with water vapor and drop into the food. Her results were confirmed by chemists.

    Some concerns with plastic in Microwave
     
  16. May 16, 2005 #15
    When I use plastic wrap it is never on the food itself. I always use a bowl or something to wrap the plastic around. I'm always worried that the plastic will melt into my food. I don't like bits of plastic in my reheated pasta.

    Didn't know anything about the chemicals from plastic though. That's interesting.
     
  17. May 16, 2005 #16

    Danger

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    Love that movie. I find it impossible to listen to the Proclaimers withou seeing Depp dancing those breadsticks around the counter. His sight gags in that show are right back to Keaton and Chaplin.
     
  18. May 16, 2005 #17

    SOS2008

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    How much more expensive are these? Especially taking into account the smaller size? It seems that many products are being packaged more creatively to justify an increase in price.

    This reminds me of a time when we took friends from England to dinner where "twice-baked" potatoes were on the menu. It was so funny when our friend asked the waitress why they couldn't get the potato cooked right the first time.
     
  19. May 16, 2005 #18

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    I didn't know Van Gogh was lost. I thought we knew where he was. Some folks just won't lay down and stay dead. Sheesh.
     
  20. May 16, 2005 #19

    plover

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    The other implication here, of course, being that, when they found him, all he had to say was: "I yam what I yam"...
     
  21. May 16, 2005 #20
    He's wandered away and been recovered several times, yes. But you can't keep a gogh man down.
    'The Sweet Potato Eaters subtitled `I yam what I yam!' by Vincent van Gogh was recovered today in a barn loft in Belgium. It depicts Popeye, Olive Oil, and Sweepea, arranged around a small table in a closed, small room, in dim orange light, at a meal consisting of nothing but sweet potatos. Japanese private parties have already offered several millions for it."
     
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