SWS (Stupid Waterloo Student) seeks CWN (Cooking With Nothing) advice

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In summary: Just put it on the roast and be happy.In summary, Tom gave great tips for cooking a sirloin tip roast. He said to sear the roast to keep the juices in, and to cut the roast if it wants to release the juices. He also said to use a slow cooker if you have one, or to mince garlic and put it on the roast. There are also various other options if you have garlic on hand.
  • #1
ok so I got this serloin tip roast from the store I want to make. It's about 2.5lbs. Then only thing is ingredients are a bit scarce. I've heard you can cook a roast in beer? (only non-scarce ingredient available) and I've got S&P, garlic, baby carrots...um, green pepper(don't know what good that would do. got some potatoes as well if you can make that with roast?

and also I'm not sure if a roast has to be covered but i only have 1 pan with a lid and it's too shallow to hold the whole roast covered so i would either have to slice the roast in half to make it not so tall, or cook it uncovered.

any thoughs from our master chefs out there?
 
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  • #3
I've got just what you need. Served me well. Its Britains top lifestyle coach.



Um unfortunately I don't cook but there are some food threads around here somewhere which may have recipes you could use.
 
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  • #4
Physics is Phun said:
ok so I got this serloin tip roast from the store I want to make. It's about 2.5lbs. Then only thing is ingredients are a bit scarce. I've heard you can cook a roast in beer?

You can indeed cook a roast in beer, though my experience says beef broth is better. French onion soup is even better than that.

(only non-scarce ingredient available) and I've got S&P, garlic, baby carrots...um, green pepper(don't know what good that would do. got some potatoes as well if you can make that with roast?

*cough* *sputter*

If you can make potatoes with roast?? Ain't you ever heard of "meat and potatoes"? :tongue2:

I would rub the roast with garlic and put the potatoes and carrots in the roasting pan (salt and pepper them to your taste). I'd save the green pepper for something else.

and also I'm not sure if a roast has to be covered but i only have 1 pan with a lid and it's too shallow to hold the whole roast covered so i would either have to slice the roast in half to make it not so tall, or cook it uncovered.

You don't have to cover the roast, but it wouldn't hurt if you had some aluminum foil to tent it with. Also, if there's a layer of fat on the meat, I'd have that on top while you roasted it.

Now for how to cook it. I would start by searing the roast on all sides in a very hot pan. This will brown it and seal in the juices. Preheat your oven to 300 C and roast for about 20 min per pound to cook it medium.
 
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  • #5
Great tips from Tom!
 
  • #6
so you're saying sear the roast to keep the juices in however that reicpe says cut the roast (assuming to let the juices out?)
what should I do!?
 
  • #7
oh and i have actual garlic not powdered garlic, should i chop (mince?) it up and put it on the roast or cook it in big chunks with it and discard?

and this is for tomrrow's dinner btw, so plenty of time left to get it right.
 
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  • #8
Physics is Phun said:
so you're saying sear the roast to keep the juices in however that reicpe says cut the roast (assuming to let the juices out?)
what should I do!?
Don't cut the roast! I see the recipe says to cut it, they're nuts.
 
  • #9
Do you have a slow cooker? Slow cooked roast with onions, carrots and potatoes added in is awesome.
 
  • #10
Physics is Phun said:
so you're saying sear the roast to keep the juices in however that reicpe says cut the roast (assuming to let the juices out?)
what should I do!?

Let it stand for about half an hour after roasting before cutting it. That will allow the juices to stablilize, and they won't run out all over the place.

oh and i have actual garlic not powdered garlic, should i chop (mince?) it up and put it on the roast or cook it in big chunks with it and discard?

Slice open the clove and rub that all over the roast. And I wouldn't discard it afterwards, rather I would mince it and let it sit in the cooking liquid with the vegetables.

Alternatively, if you want it to be extra good then you could thinly slice the garlic into slivers, then score the meat with a knife (that means make little slits all over the roast). Then insert a sliver of garlic into each slit. Do that before searing so that you can (sort of) re-seal the meat where you cut it.

Or, if you have enough garlic on hand you could do both.
 
  • #11
ok, this roast has strings tied around it. do i removes those before or after cooking?
also there is a very shiney silver band across once section of the meat. it looks almost metalic (but clearly is part of the meat) should i be concerned about this and cut it out?
so there doesn't seem to be a fat side the roast nor a piece of fat that came with it. should i rotate the roast around while it's cooking or just leave it in there for a good hour without bothering it?
 
  • #12
Physics is Phun said:
ok, this roast has strings tied around it. do i removes those before or after cooking?
also there is a very shiney silver band across once section of the meat. it looks almost metalic (but clearly is part of the meat) should i be concerned about this and cut it out?
so there doesn't seem to be a fat side the roast nor a piece of fat that came with it. should i rotate the roast around while it's cooking or just leave it in there for a good hour without bothering it?
Leave it tied. You remove the string after it's done.

You can cut the silvery band off, it doesn't matter. I can't believe my mind just went blank on what it's called, I think it's just a vein.

No need to turn the roast, but if there is no fat, you probably do want to cover it with some foil to preven the top from overcooking and drying out.

Be sure to pay attention to how long you cook it depending on how done you want it.

http://www.ochef.com/343.htm
 
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  • #13
Tom Mattson said:
Alternatively, if you want it to be extra good then you could thinly slice the garlic into slivers, then score the meat with a knife (that means make little slits all over the roast). Then insert a sliver of garlic into each slit. Do that before searing so that you can (sort of) re-seal the meat where you cut it.

Or, if you have enough garlic on hand you could do both.
I just happened to have a roast, and I just had to give this a try. :biggrin:

I did as Tom suggested - scored roast and put the garlic in while browing it. I layed some slivers in the roast pan with some olive oil.

I have extra garlic (large clove), so I placed that in the browning sillet, and I will make some garlic spinach.
Ingredients
- spinach
- olive oil
- garlic
- salt and pepper to taste
optional: halved olives
Directions
Sautee garlic in olive oil, add spinach, salt, and pepper.
Stir frequently until spinach is well cooked.
http://newdiets.com/Side_Dishes/Garlic_Spinach.shtml

or - http://www.emerils.com/recipes/by_name/garlic_spinach.html [Broken]

although now I am thinking garlic creamed spinach

http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/recipe_views/views/107761
 
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1. What is CWN (Cooking With Nothing) and why would a Waterloo student need advice on it?

CWN is a cooking method where one prepares meals using only basic ingredients and minimal kitchen equipment. Waterloo students may need advice on it because they often have limited budgets and kitchen resources.

2. Is CWN a healthy way of cooking?

CWN can be a healthy way of cooking if you choose nutritious ingredients and balance your meals with a variety of food groups. However, it may be challenging to get all the necessary nutrients without access to a full range of ingredients.

3. How can a Waterloo student cook with nothing when they have access to a kitchen?

Cooking with nothing doesn't necessarily mean having absolutely nothing in the kitchen. It's about using basic ingredients like grains, beans, and vegetables to create simple and affordable meals. A Waterloo student can still utilize their kitchen appliances and utensils, but they may need to get creative with their ingredients.

4. Are there any resources or tips for cooking with nothing that you would recommend?

Yes, there are many online resources, such as budget-friendly recipe websites and cooking blogs, that offer tips and ideas for cooking with nothing. Additionally, getting creative with spices and herbs can add flavor to simple dishes without breaking the bank.

5. How can a Waterloo student make sure their CWN meals are still tasty?

Experimenting with different combinations of ingredients and seasonings can help make CWN meals more flavorful. Also, following recipes and cooking techniques can ensure that the meals turn out tasty. Don't be afraid to get creative and try new things!

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