Synchronous 4-bit Up/down Binary Counters

In summary, the conversation discusses drawing timing diagrams for an IC and addresses a potential issue with the U(not)/D input changing during the middle of a clock pulse. It is noted that this is a common occurrence due to the finite propogation time of signals and is referred to as setup time. The data sheet should specify the specific setup time for the IC.
  • #1
ravenprp
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http://palantir.swarthmore.edu/maxwell/courses/e015/F06/labs/lab01/74191.pdf

I have this IC with me, and I have to draw the timing diagrams. I'm doing good so far, except that during the middle of a clock pulse, the U(not)/D changes from 0 to 1 (counting up to down). It happens dead in the middle of the high part of the clock pulse. What do I do? Is there some sort of precedence issue that I should follow?

Thanks.
 
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  • #2
If you look at U(not)/D, you will see it is an input. If you look at all the inputs, you will see that they all happen in the middle of a clock pulse. This is because it takes a finite amount of time for the signal to propogate into the part. This is called setup time and it should be specified in the data sheet somewhere.
 
  • #3


I would suggest consulting the datasheet for the IC you are using. It should provide information on the timing and operation of the U/D pin, as well as any potential precedence issues. It is important to follow the recommended timing and operation guidelines in order to ensure proper functionality of the IC. If you are still unsure, you may also consider reaching out to the manufacturer for further clarification or guidance.
 

Related to Synchronous 4-bit Up/down Binary Counters

What is a Synchronous 4-bit Up/down Binary Counter?

A synchronous 4-bit up/down binary counter is a digital electronic device that can count from 0 to 15 (in binary) and can increment or decrement its count based on a clock signal. It has four flip-flops that store the binary values and a logic circuit that controls the counting direction.

How does a Synchronous 4-bit Up/down Binary Counter work?

A synchronous 4-bit up/down binary counter works by using a clock signal to synchronize the counting process. When the clock signal is high, the counter increments its count by 1, and when the clock signal is low, the counter decrements its count by 1. The counting direction is controlled by a control input that can be set to either up or down mode. The current count is stored in four flip-flops, and the logic circuit ensures that the count follows the desired binary sequence.

What are the applications of Synchronous 4-bit Up/down Binary Counters?

Synchronous 4-bit up/down binary counters are commonly used in digital circuits for applications such as frequency division, time delay generation, and event sequencing. They can also be used in combination with other digital devices to perform more complex functions, such as counting up or down to a specific value or triggering specific events based on the count value.

What are the advantages of using Synchronous 4-bit Up/down Binary Counters?

The advantages of using synchronous 4-bit up/down binary counters include their simplicity, reliability, and ability to count in both directions. They also have a wide range of applications and can be easily integrated into digital circuits. Additionally, their synchronous operation ensures accurate and synchronized counting.

What are the limitations of Synchronous 4-bit Up/down Binary Counters?

One limitation of synchronous 4-bit up/down binary counters is that they can only count up to 15 (in binary) before resetting back to 0. They also require an external clock signal to operate, which can introduce errors if not properly synchronized. Additionally, they may not be suitable for applications that require a higher count range or faster counting speeds.

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