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Taking foureir integral in polar coordinate

  1. Mar 8, 2009 #1
    hi;

    I have a question about taking the foureir trasnform in polar coordinate... the quesiton is as following;
    https://www.physicsforums.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=17892&stc=1&d=1236524155

    I would like to learn that according to outermost integral ([tex]\rho[/tex]), the integral is taken. But here I would like to now how it is happened step by step... because in the second equation we have 2/[tex]\lambda[/tex] and exp(-j4pi 1/[tex]\lambda[/tex]) and G([tex]\theta[/tex])... How were they put in the equation???...

    if you can explain it, I will be really glad...

    thanks for your helps already...

    be welll...
     

    Attached Files:

  2. jcsd
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