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Technological offsprings of particle physics

  1. Jun 16, 2005 #1

    ahrkron

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    What technologies can be considered as offsprings of particle physics?
    (both everyday-life technologies and others).
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 17, 2005 #2
  4. Jun 17, 2005 #3
    Sychrotrons are now used in hospitals for radiation therapy and the like, and they were developed for particle physics.

    And on a mathematical side, some economists tried applying path integrals to the financial markets. Don't think they made any money, though...
     
  5. Jun 17, 2005 #4

    ohwilleke

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    All electronics that use quantum tunnelling. For example, nearly every computer relies upon it. This page notes the benefits of the PET scan (positron emissions) and laser based particle physics: http://www.europhysicsnews.com/full/16/article3/article3.html

    But, I think it is fair to say that some aspects have been more useful than others. The skill base involved in developing precision equipment has been very valuable.

    But, I'm not aware of any practical technological application of the fact that protons and neutrons are in fact made of quarks. I'm also not aware of any application where mesons and hadrons from second or third generation quarkers are used (indeed I'd venture that there are probably not more than three or four quark based particles other than protons and neutrinos, if that, with any practical applications), nor of any practical application that uses for the existence of mus and taus and mu-neutrinos and tau-neutrinos for any purpose other than slightly refining the effective constants used in QED calculations. Higher generation particles are universally very energy intensive to make and very short lived.

    Indeed, as far as I know, QCD's insights into the strong force, and an increasingly precise understanding of the weak force and the gluons, Ws and Zs that make those forces possible, don't even have any meaningful application to nuclear power or nuclear medicine. Engineers still basically use CRC tables (and more sophisticated equivalents) to determine the properties of nuclear isotypes and pretty much rely on black box models of alpha decay, beta decay, and gamma decay with empirically rather than theoretically determined constants.

    I suppose the other place where particle physics provides at least some insight is materials science and solid state physics. Bose-Einstein condensates, insights into possible superconductors and the like probably benefit somewhat from particle physics.
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2005
  6. Jun 17, 2005 #5

    Astronuc

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    Electron microscope and electron beam welding.
     
  7. Jun 22, 2005 #6

    Tom Mattson

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    I used to pass out an "SSC Fact Sheet" to my Physics III classes when I taught as a grad student (1996-1999). I am pleased to see that it is still online.

    http://www.hep.net/ssc/new/history/factsheet.html

    Scroll down to "Technical Spinoffs".
     
  8. Jun 22, 2005 #7

    ZapperZ

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    Er.... that would be stretching it JUST a little bit. :)

    Zz.
     
  9. Jun 22, 2005 #8

    ohwilleke

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    So do you agree with my basic premise that QCD itself is basically without practical application?
     
  10. Jun 23, 2005 #9

    ZapperZ

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    I also won't go that far. While QCD as applied to particle physics may find difficulties in finding practical applications, the form and mathematics of QCD itself has usefulness in many areas - refer to "color superconductivity".

    Zz.
     
  11. Jun 23, 2005 #10
    Yes that is very true...Many concepts used in QFT are incorporated in the 'less theoretical regions' of physics. Theoretical physics is the most central aspect and has always a use because it delivers the very backbone (ie the formalism) that supports the more applied sciences

    regards
    marlon
     
  12. Jun 23, 2005 #11

    Gokul43201

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    Stretching...why ? Do you deny the importance of say, Goldstone's work to CM and specifically to Superconductivity ?
     
  13. Jun 23, 2005 #12

    ZapperZ

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    No, because if you read my following response, I clearly mentioned an example there. I just don't think the traffic flow is only one way and in fact, may think the traffic flow here is MORE of the opposite way.

    BTW, I could have sworn that the concept of "slave boson" has already appeared before the name "Goldstone boson" appears in CM, no?

    Zz.
     
  14. Jun 23, 2005 #13

    Gokul43201

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    I don't know. I've come across the term here and there in the context of tJ models, but never bothered to take the time to look harder, or dig out the history.
     
  15. Jun 24, 2005 #14

    Astronuc

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    I stumbled across an interesting book -
    Nuclear Condensed Matter Physics: Nuclear Methods and Applications


    Electromagnetic Properties and Nuclear Decay.
    Hyperfine Interactions.
    Mössbauer Effect.
    Perturbed γ - γ Angular Correlation (PAC).
    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR).
    Nuclear Orientation (NO).
    Muon Spin Rotation (µSR).
    Positron Annihilation.
    Neutron Scattering.
    Ion Beam Analysis.

    Appendix.
    Bibliography of Advanced Topics.
    References.
    Index.
     
  16. Jun 25, 2005 #15

    arivero

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    Integral calculus is an offspring of particle dinamics.
     
  17. Jun 25, 2005 #16

    selfAdjoint

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    Say what? The seventeenth century mathematicians derived it from geometry.
     
  18. Jun 25, 2005 #17

    arivero

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    Actually the origin of all the stuff is Kepler, who influences Cavalieri, and then the well known history. Cavalieri himself is team with Galileo, no matematicians involved thus. True that Kepler makes its point in a no-mecanical treatise, the Nova Steriometrie. But as he uses it for the Area Law, we can well cheat a bit and to put the discovery under particle theory :biggrin:
     
  19. Jun 26, 2005 #18
    I think the most obvious culturally and socially is the (already mentioned) WWW. Just look at how that's changed modern culture in the decade it's been around...

    Fast electronics, data processing and computing will continue, I believe, to be the most accessable spinoffs. Look at the Level 1 Trigger for CMS and CERN; this is going to handle sustained data rates of around 5TB/s. That's a lot. The data management platform is going to ship in the order 15PB of data per year to many worldwide sites, from full Tier 1 backup and processing centres, through to MB sized transfers to individual scientists. That's much more than anyone's ever done before.

    Consider that all that data is going to be written, so after a few years of running, there's going to be a lot of data sitting there!
     
  20. Jun 27, 2005 #19

    ohwilleke

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    I think that it is fair to call the WWW more of a military spinoff than a particle physics spinoff. That is certainly where the start up money came from.
     
  21. Jun 28, 2005 #20
    I believe you are confusing the Internet and the World Wide Web, ohwilleke. The Internet is a descendent of ARPANET, as you say, originally mainly US military. Then came TCP, then TCP/IP, then the WWW sits on top of all of that.
     
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