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Teenage engineering society.

  1. Feb 2, 2010 #1
    I have started a science and engineering society for teenagers and am wondering what others think of the idea. The site is http://teenscisocity.webs.com/" [Broken] What do you think of the idea, how can I improve it?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 3, 2010 #2

    FredGarvin

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    I think it is a great idea and kudos to you for starting something like that.

    From my "tight wad" side, the only criticism I have is that I can't say I am for you using the term "engineering" since it implies that you are engineers. Obviously, since you are teens this is not possible. I would be happy if you changed the word to 'designers'.

    Any way you look at it, I think you are doing a good thing and wish you luck.
     
  4. Feb 3, 2010 #3
    OP, great idea!!!
    the term engineer is being used more often for non degree'd titles
    IMHO, I think designers (in my mind) is someone who doesn't get into the real "nuts and bolts" as much as engineers do
    kind of like the automotive term "stylists"
    now start adding simple cheap (under $50) projects and plans to your site, and you have a winner

    great to see young people involved in designing and building stuff!!!

    dr
     
  5. Feb 3, 2010 #4
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 24, 2017
  6. Feb 3, 2010 #5

    FredGarvin

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    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 24, 2017
  7. Feb 4, 2010 #6
    And why am a not a engineer?
     
  8. Feb 4, 2010 #7

    Doug Huffman

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    What is the difference between a designer, as used above, and an engineer? What does professional mean?

    Your betters/bosses/instructors tell you when you are an engineer.

    I graduated from HS and worked the next thirty years learning about and eventually directing nuclear power plant operations, but I was an 'engineer' only to the extent that my employer certified. http://www.navsea.navy.mil/shipyards/norfolk/nnsy/NuclearTED.aspx

    Your work will be improved when you are confident and proud enough to use your real name.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 24, 2017
  9. Feb 4, 2010 #8
    Yea, I am gradually changing my account names to my real name. Would you consider one to be an engineer because that is his occupation or because he has that degree?
     
  10. Feb 4, 2010 #9

    berkeman

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    Generally to be called an engineer, you need at least a 4-year degree. Otherwise, you would generally be classified as a Technician. That's how it works in industry, anyways.

    Kudos from me as well for the iniative to work on this. Keep it up!
     
  11. Feb 4, 2010 #10

    Doug Huffman

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    Engineer is neither occupation ('cept locomotive driver) nor degree. Like 'scientist', it is a way of thinking.
     
  12. Feb 5, 2010 #11
    I only have a HS dip. but have had engineer in my job title. I am not dergee's as a scientist, but am a metrologist. I consider myself a self taught engineer/scientist/technician/mechanic/chef
    (and I have also ran a locomotive
    per google
    en·gi·neer (nj-nîr)
    n.
    1. One who is trained or professionally engaged in a branch of engineering.
    2. One who operates an engine.
    3. One who skillfully or shrewdly manages an enterprise.

    There is a real problem, which I have dealt with my whole life and that is the attitude some people have that persons without a "shingle" are somehow "lesser beings"
    It irritates me to no end. I have seen guys with "on line/after work" degrees that couldn't built their way out aof a wet paperbag, and they get treated better than the tech they go to for all the answers.
    if you design something that works, you are an engineer, if you build it too, you are one step up

    dr

    ps I mean no disrespect to all the persons who have gone to school and gotten a degree, it is a commendable committment.
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2010
  13. Feb 5, 2010 #12

    FredGarvin

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    What a crock of BS. I guess since you can put a bandaid on your finger you are an MD or an RN? If you build something that works, fine. You have common sense. You do not engage the area of engineering. You do nothing that defines what an engineer does and have very little of the knowledge base an engineer strives to develop. You are a "designer" that got lucky plain and simple (I know a lot of designers that would be mad at me for giving you that title as well) .

    I am a definite proponent of getting companies that give non-degreed individuals engineer titles penalties. This has gotten completely out of hand and one of the reasons I got out of the automotive industry where this is rampant. As someone who has put in the time, money and effort to get a proper engineering education, I find it nothing
    short of insulting that you think that you are equivalent in this manner.

    I have no idea where this trend started, but the notion that people "deserve" a title that they haven't earned through proper channels is, quite frankly, self-serving, presumptuous and rude.
     
  14. Feb 5, 2010 #13

    Doug Huffman

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    Credentialism is a definite problem that results from the democratization of our language and the injection of self-esteem in education. In the limit we see job offerings in the skilled/technical classified section of newspaper want ads for 'nail technicians'.

    We ex-Navy nukes had to read resumes of the degreed applicants for our jobs. Ugggh!

    The OP's 'Teenage engineering society' thread has been hijacked.
     
  15. Feb 5, 2010 #14

    FredGarvin

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    Absolutely true. Back on track.
     
  16. Feb 5, 2010 #15
    agreed, this is a discussion for another time and place (or not)

    it is nice to see how passionate we all are about what we do for a living

    dr
     
  17. Feb 5, 2010 #16

    russ_watters

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    Pre-high school graduation, I'm not sure I would call someone a "designer" either, though I realize there are no legal implications to the title, as there are "engineer" (Ie, you can't put the word "engineer" in a business title unless you have a state licensed professional engineer as a principal).

    All this could be solved by the usage of the word "aspiring" somewhere in the title or mission statement.
     
  18. Feb 5, 2010 #17
    or "future"

    dr
     
  19. Feb 5, 2010 #18
    Not to sound like a jerk, but I'd suggest spelling the name of your site correctly if you want to spred the word effectively and show that you're a serious group.

    Creating a society where people of similar interests can get together and do what they enjoy doing is a great idea, especially in the engineering profession where many people don't make it past the "weed-out" classes in the first few years of college. I swear they try to make those as boring as humanly possible. Getting people interested in it at an early age might help them build up the momentum to overcome them, and get to work with the really fun stuff later on.

    I also agree with other posters in that you should probably add on "aspiring" or "future" to the name of your group, as it would more accurately describe who you are (and avoid angering these volatile physorg people!)
     
  20. Feb 5, 2010 #19
    it was only spirited discussion
    that why this place is so fun

    dr
     
  21. Feb 5, 2010 #20
    O , yes a good debate is always fun!
     
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