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B Telescope photo of Vega

  1. Aug 29, 2017 #1
    Hello,
    I made some photos of Vega..just by mobile camera through telescope 130 mm eyepiece 12,5 mm.
    Fig. "vega_cam" is made by usb camera eyepiece adapter but I did not manage to focus it properly..
     

    Attached Files:

  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 29, 2017 #2
    Your telescope appears to be moving around a lot. You might want to try better stabilizing your mount.
     
  4. Aug 30, 2017 #3

    davenn

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    great start, don't stop experimenting :smile:

    agreed
    90% of successful astrophotos relies on a stable mount and therefore a stable scope


    Dave
     
  5. Sep 17, 2017 #4
    thanks
     
  6. Sep 29, 2017 #5

    sophiecentaur

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    Main reason for camera shake can be pressing the shutter release. Use the delay facility if you have one. It gives things time to settle down. If you can reduce the exposure, that will reduce shutter time. Vega is bright so you can still expect it to show.
     
  7. Oct 1, 2017 #6
    Hello, thank you for advise.
    Do you experienced about photos of space? Have you some nice shots?

    Have nice day ,
     
  8. Oct 1, 2017 #7

    sophiecentaur

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    I am definitely not an expert in this stuff (less than two years into Astronomy and much less into AP) but I did spend a bit of money and thought on buying some appropriate kit. I have been doing photography for many years and that has helped a lot. I learned a quick lesson that ones own photos are not going to look like Hubble or the best terrestrial pictures. The telescope suppliers LIE !!!! in their ads when they show you all those flashy pictures of the Orion Nebula and Jupiter's great red spot. However, you can always improve and that is very satisfying.
    If you notice your pictures of Vega show strong evidence of camera movement, especially 630.jpg which has a semicircular 'trail'. That cannot be a normal star trail, bad focus or aberration. It has to be due to the camera /mount / telescope being moved during the exposure (imho). I use a DSLR and the clunky mirror mechanism is always a source of camera shake with critical pictures (despite my Anti Shake mechanism). I always use the timer and stand away from the setup for the exposure. It is usually best to ask the bus driver to stop the bus for that too (lol`)
    I am reluctant to go public because there's always a better one from someone else. This moon shot was satisfying, though. My star pictures all have at least one something annoying wrong with them! The moon was through a 80mm ED Skywatcher Equinox directly onto the DSLR sensor (so-called Prime Focus)
    Be very very careful before getting started on this business. It will demand a lot of your cash. Visual is much cheaper and you don't have 'the evidence' to show you got it wrong last night.
    moony.jpg
     
  9. Oct 1, 2017 #8

    davenn

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    really nice shot :)

    Please dont let that put you off posting

    it's all about sharing and learning ... I have been into astronomy for around 50 years and there are still many out there who are much better than me
    When I see images better than mine, it's a chance for me to learn and be shown where I went wrong with my own image
    either during the imaging or during the post processing

    Dave
     
  10. Oct 1, 2017 #9

    davenn

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    if you really want to produce some nice star photos and done in an easy way. Just use a camera and tripod
    and a lens with focal length of 50mm or less.

    Do you live in the country with a reasonably dark sky ?
    or in a town or city ?
    If in a city, are you able to drive a little way to get to a darker site .... I have to drive upwards of an hour to get to a reasonably dark site where the city sky glow is at an acceptable level

    do you have a dslr camera ( camera that can interchange lenses) what make and model ?
    if yes, what lenses do you have for it ?
    do you have a tripod ?

    a 14mm focal length, wide angle lens, on my full frame canon 5D3 and a 30 second exposure produced this ......

    2015_09_11_4207sm.jpg


    Dave
     
  11. Oct 2, 2017 #10
    What types of objects would you like to image? The techniques for imaging the moon and planets is different from imaging nebulas and galaxies. Depending on you interests, we can give you more directed advice.

    Here is an image of Jupiter taken with an 8" newtonian.
    12512492_172727499781411_3576442608566137386_n.jpg

    Here's the Orion nebula taken with the same telescope.
    12792209_172707309783430_7059378301756053708_o.jpg
     
  12. Oct 2, 2017 #11
    Hello, thank you it is very nice ( I have about 5" telescope newtonian ),
     
  13. Oct 2, 2017 #12

    davenn

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    hi there

    you didnt answer any of my questions

    I am trying to help you .... but I need your response to be able to do that :smile:

    Dave
     
  14. Oct 2, 2017 #13

    sophiecentaur

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    Those are two nice pictures. The Nebula is really 'in your face'! Just imagine the energy that produced all that.
     
  15. Oct 2, 2017 #14
    Hello,
    I am apologize... so I am living in quite light polluted area therefore, from home I can just observe planets (saturn jupiter ) and most bright stars (vega , arcturus..).
    your orion nebula is really nice.. where you take this picture and which year season do you think is best for this..?
    thank you
     
  16. Oct 2, 2017 #15

    sophiecentaur

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    This is the insidious thing about AstroPhotography. Taking several long time exposures enables you to 'see' some very impressive objects, even from a light polluted urban environment.
    That involves a tracking mount and a reasonable sized telescope (plus a DSLR or, better still, a specialised, astro camera). You will need need to spend several hundred GBP, though even on the second hand market. If you can choose your time and use the odd hour or so of clearer skies, you would be surprised how good your pictures can be.
    The second hand market in astronomical equipment is, in my experience, fairly reliable. There are a number of sites, in addition to eBay, which specialise in astro equipment and you can expect to pay 2/3 of the new price for a perfectly good piece of kit. You may have to wait for a month or two.
    Enjoy.
    You can see the Orion Nebula with the naked eye on a good night. It is really massive and binoculars can give you a really good view. Binoculars really are the best value for astronomy and you can often get a perfectly good pair for quite silly prices.
     
  17. Oct 2, 2017 #16
    I took both of these pictures under heavily light polluted skies in Michigan. The Orion nebula rises fairly early in the evening during the spring, so taking pictures of it during this time doesn't require you to stay up too late.

    To echo sophiecentaur's point, capturing the Orion nebula image took some expensive equipment and a lot of time. Planetary imaging on the other hand is quite a bit cheaper and may serve as a good starting point for astrophotography.
     
  18. Oct 2, 2017 #17

    davenn

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    you still haven't answered most of my questions
    Again we are trying to help you do better for future. Here are the questions again
    answer each of them so we know your situation


    if you really want to produce some nice star photos and done in an easy way. Just use a camera and tripod
    and a lens with focal length of 50mm or less.

    1) Do you live in the country with a reasonably dark sky ?
    or in a town or city ?
    2) If in a city, are you able to drive a little way to get to a darker site .... I have to drive upwards of an hour to get to a reasonably dark site where the city sky glow is at an acceptable level

    3) do you have a dslr camera ( camera that can interchange lenses) what make and model ?
    4) if yes, what lenses do you have for it ?
    5) do you have a tripod ?


    OK you answered Q1 that you are in a city now please continue to answer the rest of the Q's


    Dave
     
  19. Oct 2, 2017 #18

    davenn

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    going by @bruha 's profile, he is in the Prague area, and it's dreadfully light polluted

    heading south or west a bit would get him into slightly darker skies
    As I said in my earlier post, I'm also in a very light polluted area and need to travel up to an hour to get to
    an acceptable level of sky glow


    aa.jpg
     
  20. Oct 3, 2017 #19
    Hello,
    thanks yes , I should try it on Bohmerwald (we have small house there..)
     

    Attached Files:

  21. Oct 3, 2017 #20

    sophiecentaur

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    You may not want to come home, once you look at the skies there!
    Those Moon pictures are severely vignetted, I think. Could you give a sketch of the actual arrangement that you are using (showing all the lenses and their positions)? The details could be important. I remember trying to use a half of a pair of binoculars with my DSLR and I got the same extreme vignetting.
    I like the 'Prime Focus' arrangement because it is just a lens (telescope objective) and a camera sensor - just like a big camera. Easy to understand but, of course, the magnification is not very great unless you use a Barlow lens or similar.
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2017
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