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I Temperature in space

  1. Jul 20, 2016 #1
    The Kelvin scale states that the temperature is a measure of the kinetic energy of the particles(molecules) of the system. But what is the temperature of a system where there are no particles...for example free space, far away from the stellar civilisation...
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 20, 2016 #2
  4. Jul 20, 2016 #3

    davenn

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    Gold Member

    hi there

    for a start have a read of some better definitions of the Kelvin scale compared to what you wrote

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kelvin

    you will discover that temperature isn't just based on kinetic energy of the particles


    Dave
     
  5. Jul 20, 2016 #4

    Nugatory

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    That definition of temperature in terms of the kinetic energy of the particles in a system is incomplete; we also have to include a contribution from whatever radiation, like the cosmic microwave background, is out there. And even intergalactic space is not completely devoid of matter - there are a few stray atoms floating around, and the occasional highly energetic cosmic ray coming through.
     
  6. Jul 27, 2016 #5
    I have tried to think about the some thing but 'in the gaps' at molecular level of the atmosphere.
     
  7. Jul 27, 2016 #6

    jbriggs444

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    The temperature "in the gaps" between molecules does not exist. Temperature is a statistical property of large collections of things such as atoms and molecules. If you restrict your attention to a setting with a collection of zero objects, temperature is no longer an attribute of that collection.

    Apologies if I've misunderstood your posting.
     
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