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Tensile stress

  1. Jul 3, 2016 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    can someone explain about part b (tensile stress) here? in which way does the stress act?

    2. Relevant equations


    3. The attempt at a solution
    FromW wikipedia, tensile stress refres to the stress to break a rope....How does it related to the case above?
     

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  3. Jul 3, 2016 #2

    SteamKing

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    You really can't look at figure E1.7 and puzzle this out?

    Well, can you break a rope by pushing the ends together?

    Have you ever held the ends of a rope and pulled them apart?

    This is stuff kids learn when they're about 8 years old.
     
  4. Jul 3, 2016 #3
    ok,it's pulling stress.....
    i dont understand the area 7.85(110-20), can you explain about it?
     
  5. Jul 3, 2016 #4

    SteamKing

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    You have to start at part a) of the problem. That's where the thickness of the plates is established (t = 7.85 mm)

    The plate is 110 mm wide and has a 20-mm diameter rivet punched through the middle. What's the net width of material where the rivet is located?

    These are fairly simple problems to figure out from the diagrams given. If you have this much difficulty now, it's not going to look good on any exams you'll have to take.
     
  6. Jul 3, 2016 #5
    i'm confused between tensile stress and bearing stress now, arent they the same?
     
  7. Jul 3, 2016 #6
    To answer your first question, simply the largest tensile stress can be found at the middle. Why? Because this is the part where most of the expansion takes place. You seem confused at this
    It's because the formula for area here is (d)(t) where d is diameter and t is thickness thus (110-20) for the remaining area and t is (20)
     
  8. Jul 3, 2016 #7
    why
    Because this is the part where most of the expansion takes place?
     
  9. Jul 3, 2016 #8

    SteamKing

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    If these two stresses were the same, there would be no need to call them by different names.

    The bearing stress is created where the body of the rivet shank "bears" on the plate material.
     
  10. Jul 3, 2016 #9
    Say when you pull the two plates , where is the part the first to move ?
     
  11. Jul 3, 2016 #10
    the part closer to the force
     
  12. Jul 3, 2016 #11
    so, tensile stress is acted perpendicularly to the surface?
     
  13. Jul 3, 2016 #12

    SteamKing

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    Depends on which surface you are taking about. Please be more specific and use dimensions if that helps.
     
  14. Jul 3, 2016 #13
    i mean this. Force P is acting perpendicularly to cross section area = t(110-20), is it correct?
     

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  15. Jul 3, 2016 #14

    SteamKing

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    Yes, that appears to be correct.
     
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