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Tension and velocity problem

  1. Sep 28, 2016 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    You're attached to a space station moving at 25000 km/h at a distance of 500 km above earth by a rope connected to a jetpack(force 3N). Your mass is 60kg. Using the jetpack you move to the maximum extension of the rope (6m) and activate the jetpack for 3s perpendicular to the rope. What is the tension in the rope and your velocity with respect to the point of attachment on the station?


    2. Relevant equations


    3. The attempt at a solution
    I know that the equation for tension is FT=m(g+a) but i'm not sure about which acceleration to use (acceleration of the space station a=v^2/r where 'v' is 25000km/h and 'r' is 500km+distance from earth, or whether to find the acceleration by v=d/t & a=v/t where 'd' is the max extension of the rope and 't'=3s) and i'm not really sure about the velocity with respect to the point of attachment (would it just be v=d/t?)

    Any help would be greatly appreciated
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 29, 2016 #2

    kuruman

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    This problem seems to be lacking information. Yes, you move to the maximum extension of the rope, but in what direction relative to the center of the Earth?
     
  4. Sep 29, 2016 #3

    haruspex

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    That is not general enough to be worth remembering. It only applies for a vertical acceleration. Never memorise a formula if you do not also memorise the circumstances in which it applies.
    In the present problem, you have been given all sorts of largely irrelevant detail. E.g., for a completely accurate answer you would need to know the mass of the space station, but you do not. Much that is given is of lesser relevance. Your first challenge is to figure out what matters.
    Please post some thoughts on that.
     
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2016
  5. Sep 29, 2016 #4

    CWatters

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    +1

    The problem may well be easier than you think.
     
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