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Tensor Calculus

  1. Nov 15, 2012 #1
    Hello, could someone recommend a good book on tensor calculus? I'd like it to be relatively modern (I have an old book) and maybe contain some examples drawn from physics. Chapters on related subjects such as differential forms and calculus of variations would be a plus.

    Cheers.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 16, 2012 #2
    It's kind of old (Written in the late 60's), but I have used Tensor Analysis on Manifolds by Bishop and Goldberg as a reference for a while now with good results. It can be a little concise, but for the price I'm more than satisfied!

    I have only read the first few chapters in it, but The Geometry of Physics is an excellent book, I use it as an occasional supplement to Wald's General Relativity. It has a lot of worked examples, illustrations and exercises. Covers most of the standard tensor calculus stuff, but with an emphasis (obviously) on physics. To be honest, though, I found the notation and presentation kind of hard to follow.
     
  4. Nov 16, 2012 #3
    Last edited by a moderator: May 6, 2017
  5. Nov 16, 2012 #4

    George Jones

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    I, too, like Bishop and Goldberg (despite its vintage, it has a relatively modern style) and Frankel. Another possibility is Fecko.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 6, 2017
  6. Nov 16, 2012 #5
    Bishop & Goldberg is certainly "modern" enough.

    If you want something with a newer publish date, you could try

    Frankel, Geometry of Physics
    Szekeres, A Course in Modern Mathematical Physics
     
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