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Testing General Relativity, and perhaps Quantum Gravity

  1. Mar 28, 2004 #1
    Not sure where to put this, so I'll drop it here.

    It seems that both NASA and ESA are committed to performing tests that may show deviations from GR.

    NASA has LATOR

    http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2004/26mar_einstein.htm

    And ESA has LISA
    http://www.esa.int/esaSC/120376_index_0_m.html

    and GAIA,
    http://www.esa.int/esaSC/120377_index_0_m.html

    and BepiColombo
    http://www.esa.int/esaSC/120391_index_0_m.html

    The main ESA fundemental physics page explains the relation between the missions:
    http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=30467

    All of these mission should be operational by the end of the decade.
    All in all, I think that the 2010's will be an exicting time to do physics, as we may finally get some new experimental results that the theorists (which I will hopefully be joining) can sink their teeth in.

    Any thoughts, comments?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 28, 2004 #2

    LURCH

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    Yes, it is an exciting time to be alive for science. I have been following LIGO and looking forward to LISA. Meanwhile, we should be gettingnusefull information from Gravity Probe B , which is due to launch in a couple of weeks (April 17, to be exact).

    The data's on the way; gonna git some 4-1-1! :biggrin:
     
  4. Mar 28, 2004 #3

    Nereid

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    4-1-1?

    There's also a thread in General Astronomy & Cosmology talking about LATOR too; can we combine them?
     
  5. Apr 10, 2004 #4

    FZ+

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    Update: Gravity Probe B prepped for launch

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/comment/story/0,3604,1189322,00.html

     
  6. Apr 10, 2004 #5

    LURCH

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    Sorry; "information". Got a little excited.
     
  7. Apr 12, 2004 #6

    Nereid

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    Let me guess ... in the US, if you dial 411, a friendly voice-activated system will try to find a telephone number for you (in exchange for your hard-earned cash?); if it fails you *might* be connected to a real live human (possibly in the Philippines), and everyone ( :smile: ) in the US calls this 'information'? :cool:
     
  8. Apr 13, 2004 #7

    LURCH

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    Exacterly :wink:
     
  9. Apr 13, 2004 #8

    Phobos

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    let's try this in the relativity forum...
     
  10. Apr 14, 2004 #9
    @ FZ+
    Yeah!
    Gravity probe B rulz! What a fantastic piece of kit!
    Anyone fancy guessing if the GPB results will conform with GR?

    I reckon they'll totally conform!
    Space time is warped by gravity. We already knew really. And we known pretty much exactly how much it is warped, since 1916.
    But it's just nice to go over old familiar ground. Just like when you replay all the deathmatch levels on unreal tournament. 'cept this cost a bit more. About $700m more.

    But it's not a certainty!
    Has that bizzare slowing of satelitte bug been squashed yet? Any chance GPB will shed light on that?
     
  11. Apr 14, 2004 #10

    Nereid

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    Gravity Probe B

    Now's the chance for all those with alternative theories to GR: what do YOU predict the GPB results will be? Write them down, and publish them (e.g. in PF's own Theory Development).

    "bizzare slowing of satellite bug" = Pioneer anomaly? If so, AFAIK it remains just that, an anomaly; no other observations to confirm it, yet further analyses continue to fail to identify its origin as a systematic effect, due to known phenomena.
     
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