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Testosterone use in sports

  1. Dec 29, 2006 #1
    Recently someone has been stripped off the medals she has won over sports because she has consumed testosterone.
    But how can someone be accused of consuming testosterone if this chemical can be produced by the body itself?
    Will anyone be accused of consuming endorphins?
     
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  3. Dec 29, 2006 #2

    chroot

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    Usually, blood tests are taken throughout an athlete's career. If a blood test differs significantly from a previous one, it's an indication that something is amiss. Women don't just spontaneously start secreting large amounts of testosterone.

    - Warren
     
  4. Dec 29, 2006 #3

    DaveC426913

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    Naughty naughty, popular athelete. :biggrin:
     
  5. Dec 29, 2006 #4

    Monique

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    I don't know the details about the testosterone testing method, but it can be possible to distinguish endogenous proteins from pharmaceutical proteins, as is done with EPO (erythropoietin) by differences in residue patterns (that doping test is quite controversial though).
     
  6. Dec 29, 2006 #5

    arildno

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    The rules concerning regulatives on drugs are hopelessly contradictory.
    For example, pain-killers markedly increase the athlete's ability to perform, but is wholly legal for some reason.

    Norwegians have hollered to be allowed to exercise in costly "high-altitude" houses, which dramatically increases the level of oxygen-carrying hemoglobin, and thereby, there stamina with respect to other athletes.
    This is the real reason why Norwegians are so dominant in endurance sports like cross country skiing.


    Just throw all the rules into the trash bin, along with the fallacious dictum "Mens sana in corpore sanem"

    There's nothing healthy about top athlete competitions, so one should do the world a favour by destroying that myth once and for all.

    Each rule in force is there due to some deluded notion as to what is a "natural" augmentation, and what is not.
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2006
  7. Dec 29, 2006 #6

    Monique

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    Yes, this way you naturally produce EPO and it's legal. I guess the limit is that your body naturally limits what it can take, when you inject EPO you run the risk of overdosing and thus dying (which has happened quite a lot in the '90s, where atheletes died in their sleep due to EPO side-effects). And you can't really exclude atheletes that live above a certain altitude.
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2006
  8. Dec 29, 2006 #7

    arildno

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    Actually, the "high-altitude" house is right here in Oslo, in the lowlands.
    If they want to live in the highlands, then they can go and live in the highlands, like Finse.
     
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