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Textbooks you recommend

  1. Jan 17, 2005 #1
    hey guys,

    I would like you to tell me about your experiences with certain physics textbooks and point out any books that you think are worth owning. When I took classical mechanics, my professor used "Classical dynamics" by Thornton and Marion, which was ok but not that good. This year he told me about the new book on Mechanics, "Classical Mechanics" by John R. Taylor. I bought the book and let me tell you, it was the best $85 I spent! it is clear and takes you step by step and doesn't assume that you have a PhD in physics ...

    For electrodynamics, the book we used at school was Griffiths' "Introduction to Electrodynamics" and I didn't like it very much but I heard it is one of the least complicated books about that subject.

    For modern physics, I've seen Tipler's book and another one by Thornton, but I didn't really like them very much.

    If you know of any good books on those subjects, books that are elaborate, easy to understand and clear with lots of examples, then let me know.

  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 17, 2005 #2
    I strongly recommend "Mathematical Methods in the Physical Sciences" by Mary Boas. Of all these math methods books I think this one has the best balance between reference and Pedagogy.

    I think Grifiths is a great introduction to electrodynamics, but it does lack in examples. I used Lorrain and Corson which was pretty good, lost of good problems, but less easy to understand then Grifiths.
  4. Jan 18, 2005 #3


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    For math methods : I like Arfken & Weber. At a slightly lower level, I think Spiegel does a good job.
  5. Jan 18, 2005 #4
    I think Halliday Resnick & Krane "Physics" 5 ed is even simpler, and contains more examples than Griffiths.
  6. Jan 18, 2005 #5
  7. Jan 20, 2005 #6
    Strongly agree on this book as well.
  8. Jan 20, 2005 #7
    Tiplers / LLewellen's is not that good at all. I think the only reason my University uses it is because Dr. Llewellen is the head of the Physics Department. :biggrin:
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