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That song reminds me of

  1. Mar 20, 2007 #1

    Ivan Seeking

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    I have been listening to a bunch of oldies lately [drove to California this week] and was amused at what comes to mind with each song.

    It is official: I will never again hear anything by Three Dog Night without thinking of Astronuc. :biggrin:

    Heart of Gold = 45s, I guess because I wore out my copy. Who here doesn't know what a 45 is?

    The Beat Goes On = snow skiing, which is how Sonny died. Who here doesn't know who Sonny was? :yuck:

    Garden Party = the Beatles and a walrus, which Yoko brought. It also makes me think of the beach I would frequent because his [Rick Nelson] brother David owned property overlooking the area.

    Space Oddity = the weird guy up the street who was first to get the record

    ... It seems that each and every song that I listened to [that I knew] had a specific memory associated with it. And there were some really odd ones where the connection was anything but obvious.
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2007
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  3. Mar 20, 2007 #2

    Evo

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    There must be some music gene I am missing. When I hear an old song I think "I remember that", but there is never any association with a place or person or event. Nothing. :frown: I almost envy people that, like you, can link it to some other memory.

    I think it has to do with how I memorize things. T_E was saying most people have associative memory, which is why they can improve their memory by doing bizarre, complex associations to things they need to remember. My memory doesn't work that way. All memories tend to be isolated snapshots, film clips, or sound bytes that I can just randomly "pull" out when needed.

    It does leave me with a rather unemotional, bland, computer like memory. :frown:
     
  4. Mar 20, 2007 #3

    turbo

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    This is sad. Can you not listen to "Itchykoo Park" or "MacArthur Park" without connecting to the intentions of the authors? NOTE: These are just two flip off the top-of-the-top-off-my-head '60's goofy pop references. I could give you a million more with time. In fact, if you professed to be emotionally unmoved by Hendrix's "Axis Bold as Love" or Buffalo Springfield's "For What it's Worth", I would have to question whether you can achieve any level of emotional cognizance with music. I cannot imagine living, working, studying, etc, without music in the background. HS and college classes were a pain in part because they were delivered in a musical desert.
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2007
  5. Mar 21, 2007 #4

    Astronuc

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    The local NPR station had a poll last Friday regarding songs one would be embarassed if friends or associates were to hear them sing. It also ended up being a list of some of the worst (goofy) pop songs ever produced - and McArthur Park was on the list. I'll try not to associate turbo with MP. :rofl:

    I have a lot of good associations with people or events and the music that was playing at the time. And like turbo mentioned, the music helped get me through some rough or tedious times.

    :rofl: :biggrin: It's nice to know I've had a positive influence in someone's life. :rofl:

    My favorite Three Dog Night song is Liar. I don't really care so much for theme of the lyrics, but the electric organ and guitar are great. Too bad it only lasts 3 min, 4 sec. And I should call one's attention to the fact that Hoyt Axton wrote the lyrics to "Joy to the World", which was sung by TDN, as Integral correctly reminded to me concerning my signature.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hoyt_Axton

    It may have been the high fever one had as a child. Fevers, inflammation and concusive injury can cause damage to neurons or certain regions of the brain, which affect the ability of the brain to establish certain neural patterns or associations. Of course, one's brain could just develop that way.
     
  6. Mar 21, 2007 #5

    turbo

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    I just heard "Rikki don't lose that number" and immediately flashed back to the first time I heard it on the radio, riding in my buddy's old Nova convertible. We were crossing the Penobscot River on the bridge from Brewer to Bangor. The DJ didn't bother giving the name of the band, so I had to listen to a load of top-40 crap on the radio until I heard it again and noted the name so I could look for the album.

    Hearing "Time of the Season" by the Zombies makes me think of when I heard it for the second time. I was in the car with my father, headed into Skowhegan and the DJ said that the first person to show up at the studio and ID the band would get a 45 of the song. I persuaded my father to pull over on Water Street so I could run up to the studio and snagged the 45. It was a distinctive sound, and the name "Zombies" stuck the first time I heard the song. Another thing in my favor was that the studio was upstairs in a non-descript brick building downtown. I had been there to be interviewed on air some weeks before, but I'll bet that most of the resident kids in that town had no idea where the studio was.

    There's a ton more, including associations between songs and particular people. Often when I grab my guitar and play a song, I flash back to some venue and picture the person who requested it, or someone who came up to me later and said how much they enjoyed the song.
     
  7. Mar 21, 2007 #6

    turbo

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    Thank you! That was a goofy song and I only mentioned it because it was so annoying to hear everybody try to cover it. It was bad enough when Richard Harris performed it initially (his rendition of Dimming of the Day is stunning, by the way) but when Leonard Nimoy sang it, pop music had plunged to new lows.
     
  8. Mar 21, 2007 #7

    FredGarvin

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    Why would someone leave the cake out in the rain?
     
  9. Mar 21, 2007 #8

    Astronuc

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    :rofl: I think that was a low point for Harris. :biggrin: He must have been drunk out of his gourd to record that song.

    :yuck: I strongly dislike that song. I really don't care much for Steely Dan anyway.

    Stupid lyrics. Why would anyone record such a song? And how much did they have to pay radio stations to play that song?

    from AllMusic.com
     
  10. Mar 21, 2007 #9

    Ivan Seeking

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    Why would anyone leave their face in a jar by the door? That has to hurt!
     
  11. Mar 21, 2007 #10

    Ivan Seeking

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    Yeah, one the all-time cheesiest songs that I still like is Beach Baby. I can't help but think of the thousands[?] of hours spent at the beach watching girls in bikinis [not to mention surfing]. Those were very good days.
     
  12. Mar 21, 2007 #11

    Moonbear

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    I don't think I have your extreme form of this (maybe I'm heterozygous for that trait :biggrin:), but for most songs, yeah, I don't have any associations like that, but never considered it something I should worry about missing. Only a few songs have any effect on reminding me of things if they were consciously associated with an event that had a deep emotional impact. But, even then, it's pretty rare. When I hear some couple talking about "their song" because it was the one playing on the radio when they had their first kiss, or something like that, I just sit there thinking, "You actually noticed what was on the radio when you had your first kiss?" :uhh:
     
  13. Mar 21, 2007 #12

    turbo

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    One of the cheesy ones that I still like is "Tonight She Comes" by the Cars. I really hate their synth sound and programmed drums, but Elliott Easton's guitar lead on that song is incredible - his best ever! That song never even made it onto an album until their "Best of" compilation was released.
     
  14. Mar 21, 2007 #13

    turbo

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    Whenever I hear "I've Got Your Love" by Boz Skaggs, I always think of a friend of mine. She wanted to marry her live-in boyfriend and start a family, but he had been through a really messy divorce a few years before and was really gun-shy. She and I worked together for a few years and I used to bring in CDs and she really liked that CD and that song. Eventually, he popped the question, and when she organized her wedding, that was the first song played at the reception, and she and her new husband danced to it.

    http://www.amazon.com/Come-Home-Boz-Scaggs/dp/B000000WDG

    That song also features the richest, sweetest guitar lead on the whole album.
     
  15. Mar 21, 2007 #14

    Ivan Seeking

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    Tsu notices that the ceiling needs painting when we...

    oh...never mind.
     
  16. Mar 21, 2007 #15
    the beatles - maxwells silver hammer

    LOL!
     
  17. Mar 21, 2007 #16

    FredGarvin

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    Beige....I think we'll paint the ceiling beige...
     
  18. Mar 21, 2007 #17

    Moonbear

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    Perhaps you need a mural up there if she's noticing the paint. Or else, tell her to just roll over. :biggrin:
     
  19. Mar 21, 2007 #18

    Ivan Seeking

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    :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: I'm not touching that one!!!
     
  20. Mar 22, 2007 #19

    Evo

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    I listen to and enjoy music, I just don't connect anything external to it.

    Ack, I can't imagine doing anything that requires concentration with any kind of background noise. It competes with all the voices in my head. :biggrin:

    Ivan, turn off the lights.
     
  21. Mar 22, 2007 #20
    As a young man, I met a Greek woman in Israel. We did not speak each other's native language and only spoke a little Hebrew. We took a walk at night and were stopped by a couple of police on patrol. They asked what we were doing and she spoke to them in French, something like "Nous en fait une promenade." I never heard such a mundane activity described in such a striking way. I am reminded of this event anytime I hear the song "Nights in White Satin." because I first met her at a party where I also first heard this song.
     
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