The 10 most important concepts in physics

In summary: Water droplets are round because that is the shape that is most efficiently used by gravity to pull them down. Oil droplets are round because they are made of molecules that are round.
  • #1
PhysicsinCalifornia
58
0
I'm trying to collect the 10 (at most, 7 optimum) most important concepts of physics in classical mechanics.

If you were left with 7 different concepts, what would you pick? (Assuming you have to live the rest of your life with the 7 concepts that you picked)

This is "just for fun", not a question

Some concepts include:
1. Moment of inertia
2. Conservation of mechanical energy
3. Newton's 1st, 2nd, and 3rd laws
4. Newton's law of universal gravitation
5. Conservation of angular momentum
6. Torques and their conditions of equilibrium
7. Rotational kinetic energy
so on so forth

What would your list be??
 
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  • #2
Actually, when I used to teach intro physics, I wrote this on the board the very first day the students came in:

1. Conservation of momentum (linear and angular)
2. Conservation of energy (mass+energy)

I told them that for most of their physics student years, these are the ONLY two "concepts" or principles that they will be studying. Period! All the different subject matter in physics are nothing more than various "application" or manifestation of these two principles. Example: the conservation of momentum results in F=dp/dt, which is the basis for Newton's Laws.

So you'll understand if I think you have way too many...

Zz.
 
  • #3
The only other thing that I would add is the third great law of Physics:

"You can't push a rope."

Seriously, add to Zz's list: "conservation of electric charge" and "2nd Law of thermodynamics" and you take care of pretty much all of classical physics.

But referring to your list, I would definitely include "centripetal force/circular motion" and "buoyant force" high on the list of "important concepts. Also, Newton's 3 laws are three different concepts: the concept of inertia, of acceleration, and of mutual interactions. They can be rolled up into one grand concept, but if you do that,then you end up with Zz's short list again.
 
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  • #4
No no no, the only law that matters is : nature is as lazy as possible...

marlon
 
  • #5
marlon said:
No no no, the only law that matters is : nature is as lazy as possible...

marlon

Is this a reference to the "Principle of Least Action"?
 
  • #6
besides for 'physicsincalifornia' the most important aspect will certainly be static equilibrium

marlon

hahahahhaahiii

errr
 
  • #7
robphy said:
Is this a reference to the "Principle of Least Action"?

well, why do you fall down ?

where are raindrops always quasi spherical and why is oil on water always a formation of little circles?

marlon
 

1. What are the 10 most important concepts in physics?

The 10 most important concepts in physics are: motion, forces, energy, momentum, gravity, electricity, magnetism, waves, thermodynamics, and the structure of matter.

2. Why are these concepts considered the most important in physics?

These concepts are considered the most important in physics because they form the foundation of understanding the physical world and are applicable to a wide range of phenomena and scientific principles.

3. How do these concepts relate to each other?

These concepts are interconnected and build upon each other to provide a comprehensive understanding of the physical world. For example, energy is required for motion and forces to occur, and gravity is a force that affects the motion of objects.

4. Are these concepts relevant in everyday life?

Yes, these concepts are highly relevant in everyday life. They can be applied to various aspects such as the movement of objects, the functioning of electronics, and the behavior of matter.

5. How can understanding these concepts benefit society?

Understanding these concepts can lead to advancements in technology, medicine, and other fields that rely on a deep understanding of the physical world. It can also help us make informed decisions and solve real-world problems.

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