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The 787 gets its wings!

  1. Aug 27, 2011 #1

    Ivan Seeking

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    6035171879_5b04175a71.jpg
    http://www.flightglobal.com/blogs/the-networker/2011/08/787-is-certified-where-will-it-fly.html

    The 787 incorporates some of the biggest changes in commercial aircraft construction to come along in 50 years. It is considered to be revolutionary. Most notably, it doesn't have a classic air frame. The tube is the frame! IIRC, the plane is approximately 50% carbon fiber, by weight.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_GDqxnahwbk

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZlsW0RBVnVE

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f07HpUAuWgk

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F3XssrFqWF0

    Boeing has been a tremendously bright spot in the manufacturig sector. The 737-800 and a number of other models have been selling like hotcakes. But all eyes are on the 787. Big changes, big risks, big rewards!
     
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2011
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 27, 2011 #2
    that engine looks like it could digest whole goats without skipping a beat
     
  4. Aug 27, 2011 #3
    I got to see the first 787 take off from Paine Field airport :D

    Paul Allen has a museum there stocked with many restored world war two aircraft along with the only Focke-Wulf Fw 190D-13 to survive the war.
     
  5. Aug 27, 2011 #4

    dlgoff

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    I'm curious about the "long term" effects on the composite fuselage; having worked and made carbon composite items.
     
  6. Aug 27, 2011 #5

    Pengwuino

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    That transport aircraft looks like a retarded airplane :D

    OH MY GOD THAT AIRPLANE IS HAVING A BABY!!! awwwwwwwwww
     
  7. Aug 27, 2011 #6

    rhody

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    Thanks for posting that Ivan, Watching how Rolls Royce makes those engines, especially the fan blades out of 3 pieces of sandwiched titanium, with the middle layer looking like a twisted sine wave is awesome. All of the engines are assembled by hand.

    Really cool stuff.

    Rhody... :approve:
     
  8. Aug 28, 2011 #7

    Ivan Seeking

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    Glad you liked it. I've been watching this process from the inside for over ten years now and it has been quite fascinating. From the global outsourcing of major components, to just-in-time production, in-depth and extensive supply chain management, lean manufacturing technologies, the transition to carbon fiber as the primary structural material, the loss of the classic air frame, the ever more reliable, efficient, and powerful engines [note that there are only two on a transoceanic aircraft!], and perhaps above all, the insane production rates expected, this truly does represent a revolution in the commercial aircraft industry.

    I believe this is also the first commercial production aircraft to completely fly by wire. Not sure though... Airbus may have done that on the 380. But Airbus really missed the boat on this one. They simply bolted carbon fiber panels to an existing air frame. Boeing eliminated the frame and relies entirely on the carbon for its strength. This significantly reduces the weight and results in approximately 20% better fuel efficiency AND the ability to land at many regional airports - BAZINGA!
     
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2011
  9. Aug 29, 2011 #8
    Nice looking airplane! Why are the engine blades curved so much? Why are they curved one way near the center, then the other towards the outside?
     
  10. Aug 29, 2011 #9

    Ivan Seeking

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    I think the main reason for the curve at the outer edges is to allow for greater turbine speed without exceeding the speed of sound relative to the airflow. Air flow modeling surely plays a large role as well.

    In the video they state the forces acting on the blades under full load. I think they said it was 90 tons - the equivalent of hanging thirteen double-decker busses on each blade.
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2011
  11. Aug 30, 2011 #10
    What an amazing piece of engineering. It astonishing to think how advanced these big birds are getting every time a new one is released. Can't wait to ride on one of them.

    Someone told me that the carbon fibre frame poses a larger risk of exploding if it were to be hit by lighting. Although I guess the chance of it being hit might be less than having a metal can frame. What are your thoughts?
     
  12. Aug 30, 2011 #11

    Ivan Seeking

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    I chuckle in my mind every time I read this....dork. :biggrin:

    Vulnerability to lightning strikes has been a concern for a long time. I've never heard definitively how this was handled, but presumably a conductive foil or mesh is included near the surface of the carbon fiber layers. Some time ago I had heard that a wire mesh is used on at least one military aircraft - I think this was on some military channel diddy, so this too is rumor only. Exactly how this is accomplished may well be a trade secret. But lightning strikes on aircrafts are common, so you can be sure this issue has been studied in depth and the solution tested from here to eternity.
     
  13. Aug 30, 2011 #12

    dlgoff

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    I did an experiment once with http://www.acp-composites.com/home.php?cat=251" where I made a zig-zag pattern and applied 115vac. I measured the resistance/foot and determined the length to use. It made a nice "space heater". Since it's not very conductive, they must have something going on.
    [URL]http://www.acp-composites.com/images/C/tow.jpg[/URL]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 26, 2017
  14. Aug 31, 2011 #13

    Ivan Seeking

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    Here is some general information about lightning protection for carbon-fiber aircraft.
    http://www.dexmet.com/1_pdf/LSP for Carbon Fiber Aircraft.pdf

    The 787 has already taken a strike

    http://www.wired.com/autopia/2010/06/boeing-787-withstands-lightning-strike/
     
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