The ART and Arts Thread

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  • #1
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Every once in a while, a thread comes up that has 'something' to do with the 'Arts'. Past ones had the 'chicken' on the roadside, discussions about Pollock, avatars, etc.

So, I thought this may be interesting.

From paintings to film to dance to your or your child's art, whether a reference to the recent Charlie Rose interview to The cave of Lascaux, from something on eBay to something you have hanging on your walls to an interesting rock or driftwood that you found on vacation.....
 

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  • #2
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I remember reading some encyclopedia article about Da Vinci when I was 6 or 7 and seeing the Mona Lisa, and was my first enlightening to Art.

070119_monalisa_vlg_1p.widec.jpg


http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/16710927/

An art teacher invited me to see the Art Nouveau show at the Art Institute in 1974 or 75 (I ended up painting her), where I first saw Rossetti's Beata Beatrix, which is still one of my favorites.

http://www.tate.org.uk/collection/N/N01/N01279_9.jpg [Broken]


(it's about 1/3 the way down the page)
http://www.artlex.com/ArtLex/p/preraphaelite.html [Broken]

The Pre-Raphaelites were the pre-cursers to the Art Nouveau movement.
 
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  • #3
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Heather is my niece. Here is some of her work.

http://www.theclaystudio.org/artist/resident/erickson.php" [Broken]
 
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  • #4
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Heather is my niece. Here is some of her work.

http://www.theclaystudio.org/artist/resident/erickson.php" [Broken]

nice stuff----it has an 'organic' and 'clean' sense---
 
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  • #6
fuzzyfelt
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Thanks for creating this thread, and the other posts are great. I think if I began writing about art in general I might never stop, so I’ll mention an artist I haven’t studied and haven’t tried to theorize about, but just think many of his paintings are lovely. I was struck by his work when I was studying there and first saw the paintings Cosimo de’ Medici encouraged him to paint, decorating the Convent San Marco where he lived, in Florence. That said, I did read somewhere recently that Fra Angelico’s work was a favourite of Picasso, and given my tremendous admiration for Picasso's understanding, that is a great endorsement.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Fra_Angelico_043.jpg
 
  • #7
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466483253_5b6928bd18.jpg


Lucien Levy-Dhurmer was in a sub-group of artists in the Art Nouveau movement (stuff like Mucha and Toulouse-Lautrec) called the Symbolists (like Munch-'The Scream' ), which were even subdivided into two mores groups.

http://galeon.hispavista.com/jordivilanova/img/Silence.Levy%20Dhurmer.jpg [Broken]

http://img155.imageshack.us/img155/1175/1luciengn9.jpg [Broken]

http://images.google.com/images?hl=en&q=Lucien Lévy-Dhurmer &um=1&ie=UTF-8&sa=N&tab=wi


Art Nouveau was produced from about 1890-1915.

0455_1_md.jpg


http://cgi.liveauctions.ebay.com/455-Jugendstil-Anhaenger-Brass-Gilt-Art-Deco-Pendant_W0QQcmdZViewItemQQcategoryZ28221QQihZ016QQitemZ260233476423QQrdZ1QQsspagenameZWDVW#la-image-1 [Broken]


The Art Nouveau movement was going on at the same time as Einstein was getting his work going.
 
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  • #8
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The nice thing about art is that there is all levels ---Bell shaped curves, to say it another way,---for everyone. Everything (manmade, to some extent) you have on your walls, to every thing you wear and have in your house and outside it. Some like 'Realism' ("At least I can see what it is!") to Abstract and beyond---and most people have opinions about it, if asked.

tutmask.jpg


I missed seeing the tour when it was here.
 
  • #9
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That first Levy-Dhurmer is the cover on a book (by Philippe Jullian-'The Symbolists'-Phaidon Press) about the Symbolists that I have in the 'coffee table' pile--along with the physics books.
_______________________________



chavannes.jpg


I bought this a couple months ago. Its by Pierre Puvis de Chavannes, a symbolist, --chalk, terra cotta, plaster maybe---it could be 'by', or 'after'--I haven't researched it much yet--
 
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  • #10
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I've been a big fan of Storm Thorgersons work. He's most famous for doing the artwork on many of Pink Floyds albums, though he's also done work for Alan Parsons, AC/DC, Led Zeppelin, Genesis, Peter Gabriel, Dream Theater and Mars Volta.

tho_UMMAGUMMA.jpg

5142317_storm03.jpg

http://www.europetheband.com/discography/album/SSbig.jpg [Broken]
http://www.papermonkeyscomedy.co.uk/images/judy.gif [Broken]
 
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  • #11
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Every once in a while, a thread comes up that has 'something' to do with the 'Arts'. Past ones had the 'chicken' on the roadside, discussions about Pollock, avatars, etc.

So, I thought this may be interesting.

From paintings to film to dance to your or your child's art, whether a reference to the recent Charlie Rose interview to The cave of Lascaux, from something on eBay to something you have hanging on your walls to an interesting rock or driftwood that you found on vacation.....

So suddenly photography isn't art????What the hell man....
 
  • #12
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So suddenly photography isn't art????What the hell man....

hmmmm.....


I really like photography. 2 years in college actually and read a bunch of history--I was just about to post some White, Stieglitz, etc.


stieglitz_The_steerage-1907.jpg


http://www9.georgetown.edu/faculty/irvinem/visualarts/artsurvey.html


There was a photographer named Bill Brandt that was (is) excellent. whoa--and Ansel Adams.

----------------------------------


you can put some photos up if you want. I thought the other thread was for another purpose.
 
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  • #13
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The "Art of Photography" , and photography in general, is one reason why the "Art of Painting" became more loose and not "realistic" (Impressionism). Artists like Turner and El Greco did have loosely painted paintings earlier, but when photography became more widespread, a lot of painters didn't need to be so realistic, as a photograph could do the job for a lot of people wanting an 'image'.
 
  • #14
Moonbear
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Heather is my niece. Here is some of her work.

http://www.theclaystudio.org/artist/resident/erickson.php" [Broken]
Ooh, that's the sort of serving ware I like. Clean (white) but interesting shapes. I REALLY like the middle one. I could envision a lot of ways to use that, from a relish tray, or for different sauces, to single-serving desserts on a buffet. Interesting, pretty, and still useful. Very nice! :approve: (I'm guessing I probably can't afford it though.)

0455_1_md.jpg

This is how you can tell I've been studying reproduction and anatomy WAY too long. That pendant looks like the female reproductive tract to me...ovaries on the right and left, metal work for Fallopian tubes (oviducts), uterus is the red bead, and a vagina at the bottom in metalwork again, ending in a clitoris with that bottom bead. :uhh:
 
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  • #15
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MB---hmmm--I think this is jewelry for a woman

---but there's one part missing, then, according to your 'parts' list---a part that men like----what's the name of it?--it seems to be escaping me ---hmmmmm---it will come to me---


-----------

never mind---this is just the bottom half of the piece
 
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  • #16
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Interesting, pretty, and still useful. Very nice! :approve: (I'm guessing I probably can't afford it though.)
Thank you, I'm quite proud of her accomplishments. She just had a show at the Clay Studio in Phila. We bought a copy of the 'swirl bowl' pictured here http://homepage.mac.com/heathermaerickson/ceramicdesign/PhotoAlbum115.html" [Broken].
It ran $200, not too dear for an uncle.
 
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  • #17
Moonbear
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Thank you, I'm quite proud of her accomplishments. She just had a show at the Clay Studio in Phila. We bought a copy of the 'swirl bowl' pictured here http://homepage.mac.com/heathermaerickson/ceramicdesign/PhotoAlbum115.html" [Broken].
It ran $200, not too dear for an uncle.

That's pretty neat too. Though, while $200 for a bowl might be okay for an indulgent uncle, it's a bit steep for my pocketbook. (Great ideas for wedding gifts though. We have a local gallery that sells lots of neat glassware and pottery created by artisans within the state, and while they are pricey, they are something I'd consider when looking for wedding gifts.)
 
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  • #18
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indulgent uncle
Normally, I shun Walmart unless I can't get the same item at a thrift shop, so this was indeed indulgent. However I shouldn't leave a false impression. Her stuff was selling like hotcakes. We got the last swirl bowl available at the show, and as we were buying it other of her items were selling out as well.
 
  • #19
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http://scienceblogs.com/retrospectacle/upload/2007/02/hair%20cell.bmp [Broken]

http://scienceblogs.com/retrospectacle/2007/02/basic_concepts_hearing_1.php [Broken]

Some of these microphotos are good art.
 
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  • #21
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http://dukpc23.fnal.gov/~schuang/HWW/BLT/FDggHWWlvlv.gif [Broken]

If this would have been an original drawing, and you found it in some physics book at a garage sale for $1, and it was signed 'Feynman' (his authentic signature) at the bottom--who wouldn't frame it and hang it on the wall as 'Art'?

http://dukpc23.fnal.gov/~schuang/HWW/ [Broken]
 
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  • #22
fuzzyfelt
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An art teacher invited me to see the Art Nouveau show at the Art Institute in 1974 or 75 (I ended up painting her), where I first saw Rossetti's Beata Beatrix, which is still one of my favorites.

I was very influenced early on by the Pre-Raphealites and Art Nouveau movement too, so much so that my hand-writing by habit is still of an Art Nouveau style, from copying from these loose sleeve satchels my Grandfather had on Art Nouveau design.
Rewebster, do you paint and restore art?
 
  • #24
fuzzyfelt
Gold Member
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Some of these microphotos are good art.



If this would have been an original drawing, and you found it in some physics book at a garage sale for $1, and it was signed 'Feynman' (his authentic signature) at the bottom--who wouldn't frame it and hang it on the wall as 'Art'?



Yay! Interesting thought.
There was a slide once by Roger Penrose, and some working drawings of a British string theorist (can't remember his name) at the Royal Academy (2005?). They'd been invited to exhibit as non-artists, to show how important drawings are to understanding science, and Penrose wrote about that.

I've read that Penrose was inspired by Escher to create the tiles, and Escher in turn was inspired by Penrose's tiles for his art.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Penrosetiling.p1.gif [Broken]
http://www.precisionstrobe.com/jc/eschertiles/eschertiles.html

Also, Roland Penrose, the Surrealist Artist who wrote biographies of friends Picasso, Max Ernst, Miro, Man Ray, and organised exhibitions of his and their's and other famous artist's work, was a close relative of Roger Penrose.

This may also be interesting.
Let us consider Marcel Duchamp's famous "rectified" readymade Apolinère Enameled, created in 1916-1917
http://www.marcelduchamp.org/ImpossibleBed/PartI/
Not forgetting this artist, too,
Oscar Reutersvard
http://www.psychologie.tu-dresden.d...llusionworks.com/html/art_of_reutersvard.html
 
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  • #25
fuzzyfelt
Gold Member
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I'm not able to edit now, but, they were actually loose leaf sheets of Art Nouveau designs, that were treasured, that my Grandfather had a long time ago.
Also, I failed to make a point with the last post, which was simply that those examples all seemed rather like art, and some like science and maths as well.
 
  • #26
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I was very influenced early on by the Pre-Raphealites and Art Nouveau movement too, so much so that my hand-writing by habit is still of an Art Nouveau style, from copying from these loose sleeve satchels my Grandfather had on Art Nouveau design.
Rewebster, do you paint and restore art?

Yeah--I've had one man shows, and some of my art is hanging from California to New York and even in Mexico, and a library. I don't do quite as much now, and I've been turning down work on restorations and commissions. I keep busy in my creative/spare time working on a paper dealing with some of my own thoughts on foundational and fundamental aspects of field and particle physics from the level of knowledge and interest that I have as a 'non-academician'.

But, 'Art' will always be in my blood. I got totally distracted from art and everything else for about four years restoring an 1866 Italianate mansion that I bought, too. Things change, maybe I'll get back into it even more later.
 
  • #27
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http://dukpc23.fnal.gov/~schuang/HWW/BLT/FDggHWWlvlv.gif [Broken]

If this would have been an original drawing, and you found it in some physics book at a garage sale for $1, and it was signed 'Feynman' (his authentic signature) at the bottom--who wouldn't frame it and hang it on the wall as 'Art'?

http://dukpc23.fnal.gov/~schuang/HWW/ [Broken]

I'd say its a schematic, but the lettering...
 
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  • #29
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Some people don't think about buildings as being 'art'.


mansion.jpg


This was my 'art' project for about four years back in the 80's in my spare time. It had 5 bedrooms, 5500 sq ft on the first and second floors, plus a full basement, and a fully floored attic (with 15 ft ceiling in some places)---so it had a little over 10,000 sq. ft. of 'floor space'. One room (the dining room/ballroom) was 15ft by 35ft.

It took a really long time just to clean up the yard, trees growing everywhere including a bunch next to the foundation, not to even mention the inside. It was vacant 25 years and was used just as storage for those years.
 
  • #30
3,042
16
Some people don't think about buildings as being 'art'.


mansion.jpg


This was my 'art' project for about four years back in the 80's in my spare time. It had 5 bedrooms, 5500 sq ft on the first and second floors, plus a full basement, and a fully floored attic (with 15 ft ceiling in some places)---so it had a little over 10,000 sq. ft. of 'floor space'. One room (the dining room/ballroom) was 15ft by 35ft.

It took a really long time just to clean up the yard, trees growing everywhere including a bunch next to the foundation, not to even mention the inside. It was vacant 25 years and was used just as storage for those years.

Do you have finished picture? I bet it has really nice wood floors inside.


BTW, finally an interesting thread for a change! Nice job!
 
  • #31
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Do you have finished picture? I bet it has really nice wood floors inside.


BTW, finally an interesting thread for a change! Nice job!

The entire house had the old solid oak floors, and there was a snow white Italian carved five by six foot marble fireplace mantle and surround---plus a whole bunch more.

Do you see that vine on the left side of the bay window? I pulled that down a couple days after I took that photo. What I didn't know was that there was a bee hive entrance into the joice spaces in the eave of the bay window where the vine was growing. I looked at the front of my shirt and there were about 30-40 bees on it. I raced around the back of the house knocking as many bees as I could off, jumped in the truck, and ended up having about 15-20 stings. I smelled like half pollen/half honey the rest of the day. That's just one of the 'funny' things that happened.

I hired a tree trimmer to cut off a 'limb' which was about 30 inches in diameter and 20 ft up from the ground of a 90 ft tall hard maple because that limb was splitting; and the next wind storm would have sent the limb to crush the wing of the house with the bay window---then, it would have been torn down.

Sometime toward the middle of the third year of working on it, just about every weekend and two to three times a week after 'normal' work, just after cleaning out the attic (the windows had been broken out most of the 25 years it was vacant), I started back working after a three to four month 'stoppage' of working on it (I had to stop for those months because I caught histoplasmosis). I found out then, that, the town had been on the previous owner's back to tear it down for most of the 25 years--they thought that I was 'quitting' on it, during the time I was recuperating. They gave me a 'list' of about 25 things that an 'expert' thought should be done.

I got to about 22 1/2 'things' done all by myself (the '1/2' of the '22 1/2' was, of the 163 broken panes of glass, I had repaired 101 myself --a lot were those arched ones, in the top half of the windows and each side (pane) of the top half was 14 inches by 42 inches--I didn't even count how many total panes in the house, just the broken ones). The other things on the 'list',-- repairing the chimneys, repairing the half broken slates in the patterned slate roof, and the soffit-- had 'professional' estimates of 25 to 50k.

I went into it as a part time thing, and decided that the time frame was against me for what the city wanted and the time ultimatum they gave me after several more discussions. I ended up only loosing about 20k, not counting any of my time or most of misc. expenses of those four years.

The couple that bought in ended up spending about 200k on it; and it's considered a city 'treasure' now, and on the "National Historic Site" list.
 
  • #32
fuzzyfelt
Gold Member
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Yeah--I've had one man shows, and some of my art is hanging from California to New York and even in Mexico, and a library. I don't do quite as much now, and I've been turning down work on restorations and commissions. I keep busy in my creative/spare time working on a paper dealing with some of my own thoughts on foundational and fundamental aspects of field and particle physics from the level of knowledge and interest that I have as a 'non-academician'.

But, 'Art' will always be in my blood. I got totally distracted from art and everything else for about four years restoring an 1866 Italianate mansion that I bought, too. Things change, maybe I'll get back into it even more later.

That all sounds great and very interesting!
Sounds as though your beautiful house was a work of art in progress too, such a shame about what happened. I imagine the completion of your vision would have been wonderful.
 
  • #35
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