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B The bending of light on a single point

  1. Feb 27, 2017 #1
    Say you have two stars, star A and star B, separated by a distance of x, and the light from star A went directly from A to B but was heading directly for the centre point of star B.
    If the light passed near star B then due to the mass the will bend, yet if it was to pass through (or try to) the centre with all other forces consider negligible which direction would the light bend to? Or would it bend at all?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 27, 2017 #2

    A.T.

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    The first question basically answers the second.
     
  4. Feb 27, 2017 #3
    How?
    The first part is asking if light will bend the second part is offering a second option that light might take in this situation.
     
  5. Feb 27, 2017 #4
    If you send a light ray straight through a star then of course (by rotational symmetry) it can not bend in any direction. The wavelength of the light will of course be affected by the gravitational field but the direction will not.
     
  6. Feb 27, 2017 #5

    PeterDonis

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    If that is true then the light won't bend at all, it will just hit star B and be absorbed.
     
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