The bodies homeostatic responses to excercise

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In summary, during exercise, the body's temperature, blood pressure, and respiration all increase in response to the increased demand for energy and oxygen. After exertion, the body's temperature may be lower due to thermoregulation mechanisms to cool the body down.
  • #1
Moogoo
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So I'm trying to research all the bodies homeostatic responses to excercise. I have temperature and the details of what happens there but I am struggling to find information on , Energy (glucose), Respiration and blood pressure. Also am I missing any other items here? And does anyone know of a site that can help me? Apologises if I haven't set this out correctly, I'm trying to get to grips with how this forum works.

Am I right in thinking the blood pressure rises do to the increased need for more blood which carries oxygen and waste materials away form the pumping muscles?

And respiration increases as the body needs more oxygen for the muscles.

One thing I am very unclear on though - why is it that if you take a persons temperature right after exsertion, their temeprature is lower then it was when they were resting.

Many Thanks

Moogoo
 
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  • #2
Yes, you are correct that blood pressure rises due to increased need for more blood to carry oxygen and waste materials away from the working muscles. Respiration also increases as the body needs more oxygen for the muscles. As for your question about why the temperature is lower after exertion, it is because the body is trying to cool itself down in order to regulate its internal temperature. During exercise the body generates a lot of heat, and to prevent overheating it will activate thermoregulatory mechanisms such as increased sweating, which helps to cool the body by evaporative cooling. This lowers the body's temperature until it reaches homeostasis again.
 
  • #3
Dear Moogoo,

I can provide you with some information on the body's homeostatic responses to exercise. You are correct in your understanding that the body's temperature increases during exercise due to the increased metabolic activity in the muscles. This is because the body produces heat as a byproduct of energy production.

In terms of energy (glucose), during exercise, the body uses stored glucose (glycogen) as its primary source of fuel. As the intensity and duration of exercise increases, the body may also use other sources of energy such as fats and proteins.

Respiration, or breathing, is also a key response to exercise. As you mentioned, the body needs more oxygen to produce energy for the muscles, so respiration increases to supply oxygen to the body and remove carbon dioxide, a waste product of energy production.

Regarding blood pressure, it is normal for it to increase during exercise as the body needs to deliver more oxygen and nutrients to the working muscles. This is also why it is important to warm up before exercising, as it allows the body to gradually increase blood flow and avoid sudden spikes in blood pressure.

You are correct in your understanding that the body's temperature may be lower immediately after exercise. This is because during exercise, the body's cooling mechanisms, such as sweating, are activated to regulate the body's temperature. Once exercise stops, these mechanisms may continue for a short period, leading to a temporary decrease in body temperature.

If you are looking for more information on the body's homeostatic responses to exercise, I recommend checking reputable scientific sources such as peer-reviewed journals or textbooks. You can also consult with a fitness professional or medical expert for more personalized information.

I hope this helps in your research. Good luck!

Sincerely,
 

Related to The bodies homeostatic responses to excercise

1. What is homeostasis and how does it relate to exercise?

Homeostasis is the body's ability to maintain a stable internal environment despite external changes. During exercise, the body's homeostatic responses work to regulate temperature, blood pressure, and other physiological processes to keep the body functioning properly.

2. What are some examples of homeostatic responses during exercise?

Some examples include an increase in heart rate and breathing rate to deliver more oxygen to the muscles, sweating to regulate body temperature, and the release of hormones to regulate blood sugar levels.

3. How does the body adapt to exercise over time?

With regular exercise, the body's homeostatic responses become more efficient. This means that the body can sustain exercise for longer periods of time and recover more quickly. Additionally, the body may also experience physiological changes such as increased muscle strength and endurance.

4. Are there any negative effects of homeostatic responses to exercise?

In general, the body's homeostatic responses are beneficial for maintaining overall health and well-being. However, overexertion during exercise or not allowing for proper rest and recovery can lead to negative effects such as exhaustion, injury, and decreased performance.

5. How can we support the body's homeostatic responses during exercise?

To support the body's homeostatic responses during exercise, it is important to stay hydrated, eat a balanced diet, and allow for proper rest and recovery. It is also important to listen to your body and adjust the intensity and duration of exercise as needed.

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