The Bohr model of the H atom for anyone who needs it

In summary, the conversation begins with a person sharing that their question was answered before they could post it, but they are leaving it up for others. Another person asks for help with calculating energy values, and someone else suggests it is related to the electromagnetic force and provides a formula. However, another person corrects them and explains that the energy values in the Bohr Model are a combination of electrostatic and kinetic energies.
  • #1
mathzeroh
98
0
hey everyone! good morning!

i just took like 15 minutes drawing this to ask a question, but the funny thing is that my question got answered as i was about to post this! :biggrin: :biggrin: so I'm leaving this up for anyone who wanted to look at it!

Take care and enjoy! :cool:

Note about the attachment: Jumps a to c are in the ultraviolet portion of the spectrum, d and e are in the visible range, and f is in the infrared region.
 

Attachments

  • Bohr Model.JPG
    Bohr Model.JPG
    24.5 KB · Views: 503
Chemistry news on Phys.org
  • #2
I am sorry to bring this up but may I ask if you could tell me how to calculate those energy values as shown in your picture. I am still in my K12 and really don't know how to do, can you help me ?

If I am not mistaken (to the most), I can only calculate 1/9, the other 8/9 is out of my ability, but I am sure I can sit all day only to observe the values of which I am completely jealous since none of the solutions comes to my mind...Could you kill away my jealousy ? -lol- I am thankful for your help if offered...
 
  • #3
My educated guess would be that it is the difference in energy due to the EM force keeping the electron in orbit. That force is

[tex] F = \frac{kq_1q_2}{r^2} [/tex]

q are the two charges (proton, electron), r is the radius of separation which is given in hte diagram. k = 9x10e9
 
  • #4
Thank you whozum so much,
 
  • #5
whozum said:
My educated guess would be that it is the difference in energy due to the EM force keeping the electron in orbit. That force is

[tex] F = \frac{kq_1q_2}{r^2} [/tex]

q are the two charges (proton, electron), r is the radius of separation which is given in hte diagram. k = 9x10e9
Not quite.

The energies in the Bohr Model are the sum of elerctrostatic potential and kinetic energies.

http://www.walter-fendt.de/ph11e/bohrmath_e.htm
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #6
I was close! I thought of that also.
 

Related to The Bohr model of the H atom for anyone who needs it

1. What is the Bohr model of the Hydrogen atom?

The Bohr model is a simplified representation of the Hydrogen atom proposed by Danish physicist Niels Bohr in 1913. It describes the atom as a small, positively charged nucleus surrounded by negatively charged electrons in specific energy levels.

2. How does the Bohr model explain the stability of the Hydrogen atom?

The Bohr model suggests that the electrons in a Hydrogen atom can only occupy certain energy levels, or orbits, which are determined by the balance between the attractive force of the nucleus and the repulsive force of the electrons. This results in a stable atom with no net energy loss.

3. Why is the Bohr model considered a classical model of the atom?

The Bohr model is considered classical because it is based on classical physics principles, such as the concept of stable orbits and the conservation of energy. This model was later replaced by the quantum mechanical model, which takes into account the wave-like nature of electrons.

4. How does the Bohr model explain the emission spectrum of Hydrogen?

The Bohr model explains the emission spectrum of Hydrogen by showing that electrons can jump between energy levels, emitting or absorbing energy in the form of photons. The energy of the emitted photons corresponds to the difference in energy between the two levels.

5. Is the Bohr model applicable to other atoms besides Hydrogen?

While the Bohr model was initially developed for Hydrogen, it can be applied to other atoms with one electron, such as Helium. However, it does not accurately describe the behavior of atoms with multiple electrons. The quantum mechanical model is needed for a more accurate representation of these atoms.

Similar threads

Replies
7
Views
1K
  • Quantum Physics
Replies
3
Views
966
  • Chemistry
Replies
2
Views
3K
  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
2K
  • New Member Introductions
Replies
1
Views
375
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
12
Views
1K
  • Atomic and Condensed Matter
Replies
3
Views
4K
Replies
1
Views
2K
  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
7
Views
3K
Replies
1
Views
1K
Back
Top