The cost-benefit ratio of American life

In summary, the Federal Consumer Quality-Of-Life Control Board released a report indicating that the cost of living now outstrips life's benefits for many Americans. The report also indicates that child-rearing, a course taken by many people, is actually contributing to the problem. Derek Capeletti of Wells Fargo Capital Management said that the increasing cost of living is reflected in increased costs for clothing, groceries, and other expenses. Capeletti added that long-term, conservative partnerships provide limited returns, tying up capital and limiting options. Finally, Harold Green still needs a wife...
  • #1
SOS2008
Gold Member
42
1
In follow-up to concerns about the rising cost at the gas pumps:
WASHINGTON, DC—A report released Monday by the Federal Consumer Quality-Of-Life Control Board indicates that the cost of living now outstrips life's benefits for many Americans.

To arrive at their conclusions, study directors first identified the average yearly costs and benefits of life. Tangible benefits such as median income ($43,000) were weighed against such tangible costs as home-ownership ($18,000). Next, scientists assigned a financial value to intangibles such as finding inner peace ($15,000), establishing emotional closeness with family members ($3,000), and brief moments of joy ($5 each). Taken together, the study results indicate that "it is unwise to go on living."

Experts nationwide have corroborated the report's findings.

"The average citizen's lousy, smelly, uncomfortable daily-transportation costs rose 2.1 percent in January," Derek Capeletti of Wells Fargo Capital Management said. "Clothing costs were up 2.3 percent, reflecting an increased need for the pleated khakis, sensible sweater-sets, and solid ties we have to wear to our awful ****ing jobs. And grocery expenses were up almost 4 percent, reflecting the difficulty that light-beer, microwave-burrito, and rotisserie-chicken makers have faced in meeting the needs of a depressed economy and citizenry."

Capeletti added: "The benefits of living remained stable or decreased. Especially—surprise, surprise—in our love lives."

According to the study, high-risk, short-term, interest-based investments in the lives of others cost thousands of dollars a year and rarely yield benefits, financial or otherwise. Although conservative, long-term partnerships do provide limited returns, the study indicates that they tie up capital and limit options.

Child-rearing, a course taken by many people who choose to live, is actually contributing to the problem. Despite life's depreciating value, Alvi did not recommend that shareholders divest themselves of their holdings.
I knew it -- I have even divested myself of my plants!
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
With the rising cost of living, I too have been finding ways to make ends meet. For example, I don't have a pet--I just go to the pet store for the afternoon, I pick fruit off other people's trees, and I leave trash out for the landscapers to clean up so I can save on garbage bags. I would appreciate more ideas from PF members on other ways to balance the ratio?

(Just kidding about the trash :-p )
 
  • #3
Take a dump in the street instead of flushing. Saves on water. Did it all the time back in College
 
  • #4
Smurf said:
Take a dump in the street instead of flushing. Saves on water. Did it all the time back in College
:smile: Do I dare ask what you use for paper? Maybe you find large leaves off other people's trees?

Another way to save money is to ask for a sample of everything at the grocery store, ice cream shop, etc. until you are nice and full. :-p
 
  • #5
I gave up my monthly salon wax. Now I have to do it myself with a roll of duct tape from the Home Depot store.
 
  • #6
Smurf said:
Take a dump in the street instead of flushing. Saves on water. Did it all the time back in College
And I thought peeing in other people's pool was bad!
 
  • #7
Math Is Hard said:
I gave up my monthly salon wax. Now I have to do it myself with a roll of duct tape from the Home Depot store.
:smile: What a great idea--and far more inventive than turning underwear inside out to save on laundry. I've taken to letting the neighbor's dog give me a good licking to save on taking showers.
 
  • #8
Math Is Hard said:
I gave up my monthly salon wax. Now I have to do it myself with a roll of duct tape from the Home Depot store.
Harold Green still needs a wife... :-p
 
  • #9
Smurf said:
Take a dump in the street instead of flushing. Saves on water. Did it all the time back in College


I would have actually believed you (only because its you) if i didn't know you were still in high school.
 
  • #10
Damn, I've been caught.
 
  • #11
Danger said:
Harold Green still needs a wife... :-p
I knew you'd show up as soon as someone mentioned duct tape...or a dog...? Or did you wear your costume out already?
 
  • #12
SOS2008 said:
I knew you'd show up as soon as someone mentioned duct tape...or a dog...? Or did you wear your costume out already?
Naw... I learned that lesson years ago. This one's Kevlar. :wink:
 

Related to The cost-benefit ratio of American life

1. What is the cost-benefit ratio of American life?

The cost-benefit ratio of American life refers to the balance between the costs and benefits associated with living in the United States. This includes factors such as the cost of living, access to healthcare and education, job opportunities, and overall quality of life. It is a complex and dynamic concept that varies depending on individual circumstances.

2. How is the cost-benefit ratio of American life determined?

The cost-benefit ratio of American life is determined by analyzing various economic, social, and cultural factors. This includes measuring the costs of living, such as housing, food, and transportation, against the benefits of living in the United States, such as job opportunities, access to healthcare, and education. It also takes into account individual preferences and values.

3. Is the cost-benefit ratio of American life the same for everyone?

No, the cost-benefit ratio of American life can vary greatly depending on individual circumstances. Factors such as income level, location, age, and personal values can all impact how an individual perceives the costs and benefits of living in the United States. Additionally, the cost-benefit ratio can change over time as economic and social conditions evolve.

4. How does the cost-benefit ratio of American life compare to other countries?

The cost-benefit ratio of American life is difficult to compare to other countries as it is a highly subjective and complex concept. However, studies have shown that the United States has a higher cost of living compared to many other developed countries, but also offers higher incomes and better job opportunities. Other factors, such as access to education and healthcare, vary greatly among different countries.

5. Can the cost-benefit ratio of American life be improved?

Yes, the cost-benefit ratio of American life can be improved through various policies and initiatives. This can include measures to reduce the cost of living, such as affordable housing and healthcare, as well as programs to increase job opportunities and access to education. It also requires addressing systemic issues such as income inequality and social disparities. Ultimately, improving the cost-benefit ratio of American life will require a multifaceted and ongoing effort from individuals, communities, and policymakers.

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