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The Dark Side of Elephants

  1. Nov 5, 2005 #1

    Ivan Seeking

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    Did anyone watch this?
    http://www.nationalgeographic.com.a...asp?mode=program&tdatetime=11/2/2005+19:30+PM

    It seems that wild elephants are gathering in groups as large as 100 strong to attack villages in India for not only food, but some believe with the intent to kill people. But the story gets even more interesting... There were a few amazing claims made wrt the intelligence and intent of the attackers. It is said that one elephant even learned to knock on the front door of a house, and when the occupant to answer he or she is grabbed and killed. One expert states that the elephants know exactly what they are doing.
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2005
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  3. Nov 5, 2005 #2

    Evo

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    I only saw the previews. Elephants are rebelling against oppression and slave labor. Can't blame them. Seriously, elephants are very interesting. They supposedly have ancestral memory, but that could be more like a bird knowing instinctively to migrate. How they know these things is remarkable.
     
  4. Nov 5, 2005 #3
    Viva la revolucion! roflmao

    Yeah, I heard about this a few years ago. I didn't know it still kept up, I thought they decided to kill the herds.
     
  5. Nov 6, 2005 #4

    Ivan Seeking

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    It seems that they have a bit of a problem since elephants are considered to be sacred. So I think the elephants realized that they have a psychological advantage. :biggrin:

    It is something to behold. They easily destroy buildings and cars.
    As an aside, it seems that there was a question as to whether or not elephants run.
    http://whyfiles.org/shorties/128elephant_run/

    Moonbear, perhaps elephants gallumph? :biggrin:
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2005
  6. Nov 6, 2005 #5

    matthyaouw

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    http://www.blueplanetbiomes.org/african_elephant.htm

    http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2005/06/0603_050603_elephants.html
     
  7. Nov 6, 2005 #6

    Evo

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    That would be like taking a group of children and letting them loose to raise themselves. If there is no one to teach them right from wrong, what do they expect?

    Interesting Matthyaouw, thanks!
     
  8. Nov 6, 2005 #7

    Moonbear

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    Maybe. It sure sounds like gallumphing to me. :biggrin: Though, I can't view the movies on that site. I only get the audio and a message that I need to install another component for quicktime, but it doesn't tell me which one and just takes me to Apple's website with a list of third party components.
     
  9. Nov 6, 2005 #8

    DaveC426913

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    Knock Knock.
    Who is it?
    Landshark.
     
  10. Nov 6, 2005 #9
    Oh they were influenced by SNL!!!!! That explains a lot.
     
  11. Nov 6, 2005 #10

    Ouabache

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    I remember reading about the same thing happening in Sumatra twenty years ago. (The Elephants' Revolt) The pachyderms came galloping in triumph through their villages, terrorising residents, smashing homes and destroying crops.

    Or maybe they were galumphing (either that or we've been through the looking glass, once too often). :wink:

    Here is fact sheet about a few other unhappy elephants. :frown:
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2005
  12. Nov 6, 2005 #11

    -Job-

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    Without denying that elephants might have some degree of intelligence, claiming that they're knocking on doors is a little hard to believe. I imagine they're throwing their body against the door trying to break in and the people go "oh my god, he's knocking on the door, he's knocking on the door".
    He's knocking on the whole wall. :smile:
     
  13. Nov 6, 2005 #12

    Evo

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    Sad. :frown: These are beautiful, intelligent, social animals. There should be laws against their use as toys and slaves. :devil:
     
  14. Nov 6, 2005 #13
    beautiful, intelligent, huge, and pissed. I vote for freedom, just so they don't kill me.
     
  15. Nov 6, 2005 #14

    Evo

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    At least they don't use guns. Now that would be a real problem. :bugeye:
     
  16. Nov 6, 2005 #15

    cronxeh

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    You cant hug your children with nuclear arms! :rofl:
     
  17. Nov 6, 2005 #16

    Ouabache

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    Agreed... Unfortunately there are many cultures who continue to try and domesticate them as work or pack animals (and done so for several centuries). Then there are cultures like ours who are willing to pay to see them at the zoo or the circus.
     
  18. Nov 6, 2005 #17

    Ivan Seeking

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    :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

    Pizza man.
     
  19. Nov 6, 2005 #18

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    If they can knock on doors they can figure out how to use a riffle. They certainly have the extremities for it. With their accute sense of positioning we ought to train them and send them to war, no need for GPS. :smile: I don't want to get into a whole debate on which animal would perform best in war again, but elephants are certainly high on the list.
     
  20. Nov 6, 2005 #19

    Ivan Seeking

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    I know the claim sounds a bit outrageous but seriously, if a bird can fashion a wire into a hook in order to retrieve food, I don't find it so hard to believe that an elephant could learn to knock on a door. I've seen more difficult tricks performed in circus acts.
     
  21. Nov 7, 2005 #20

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    But they would need conditioning, where does that come from? They may be around people knocking on doors, but there's no reward/punishment hence no positive/negative conditioning.
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2005
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