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The Einstein Century conference in Paris 2005

  1. Dec 9, 2004 #1

    marcus

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    2005 is the centennial of einstein's 3 papers (special rel, E=mc2, photons and the photoelectric effect) and the year has been named the Year of Science

    on 18-22 July 2005 there will be conference in Paris called "Eintein Century"
    or "Einstein2005" conference

    there is the list of the 24 plenary speakers here:
    http://einstein2005.obspm.fr/indexr.html
    (select conference from the menu at top, and click of "plenary speakers")

    among the two dozen chosen speakers, I was pleased to see Abhay Ashtekar, and also Carlo Rovelli.

    Also Thanu Padmanabhan ("From Gravitons to Gravity: Myth and Reality")
    and Roger Penrose
    Alain Connes
    Gerard 't Hooft
    Steven Weinberg
    Brian Greene (of string theory fame)

    it can be seen that no one viewpoint predominates
    at least in the sector of the plenary (full conference) talks
    it could be lively at times.
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2004
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  3. Dec 9, 2004 #2

    dextercioby

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    Sorry,Marcus,but you're wrong here.Einstein sends 6 papers to "Annalen der Physik",of which only 4 were published in 1905,the other 2 at the beginning of the following year.
    U don't believe me...?????Check this out...
    proof

    Daniel.

    PS Future advice when writing something in connection with the history of science (especially physics):DOCUMENT YOUR STATEMENTS!!!You might encounter documented readers/listners.

    PPS:Sorry for being harsh,but history of physics is my strength and u are the "PHYSICS EXPERT IN 2003".Those mistakes are unacceptable at your level.
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2004
  4. Dec 9, 2004 #3

    marcus

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    I believe you :smile:
    sorry about my lapse

    bravo Daniel, I am glad that you know so much about History of Science!
    It is an important and useful branch of knowledge.
    I cannot claim much expertise myself, but we have a several people here at PF who know a fair amount of science history.

    the FOUR then that A.E. published in 1905, what were their German titles?
    Sometimes it is nice to have a little contact with the original language.
    perhaps you could supply them for us?
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2004
  5. Dec 9, 2004 #4

    dextercioby

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    "Über die Elektrodynamik bewegter Körper"
    "On the electrodynamics of moving bodies"

    "Ist die Trägheit eines Körpers von seinem Energieinhalt abhängig?"
    "Is the inertia of a body dependent upon its energy content?"

    "Über die von der molekularkinetischen Theorie der Wärme geforderte Bewegung von in ruhenden Flüssigkeiten suspendierten Teilchen".
    “On the Movement of Small Particles Suspended in Stationary Liquids Required by the Molecular-Kinetic Theory of Heat."

    "Über einen die Erzeugung und Verwandlung des Lichtes betreffenden heuristischen Gesichtspunkt"
    "On a Heuristic Viewpoint Concerning the Production and Transformation of Light"


    Daniel

    PS.Thenx,GOOGLE!!

    EDIT:Could it be made a "sticky"?
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2004
  6. Dec 9, 2004 #5

    marcus

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    also thanks to you Dexter
    I like the German word Trägheit
    which carried over raw into English cognates would be "Drag-hood"
    I suppose a better but still non-technical translation would be Sluggishness.

    Träge is how one feels in the morning before coffee, draggy, or?

    Is the Sluggishness of a Body of its Energycontent from-hangy?

    Yes it is a no-no to do this with other languages, but it sometimes helps me remember the orginal.
    So if you heat a block of metal, thus raising its energycontent, you give it more inertia. No vision of Hiroshima there, just raising the sluggishness of a piece of metal by heating.

    BTW what yer studying at Leuven?
     
  7. Dec 9, 2004 #6

    dextercioby

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    Fourth and final year of university studies.The habit of documenting upon historical (scientifical) facts "came to me" since high-schools and is linked to the the same habit that my (now retired) ex teacher had.It's one thing for which to thank till the rest of my life.

    Daniel.

    PS.Not only science.Sports as well.Do you know who was the greatest/most succesfull (track) athlete of all-time...??
     
  8. Dec 9, 2004 #7

    marcus

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    :biggrin:
    you are getting me into another situation where I dont have the web-reference and you do. I cant say that I know but I will guess
    that it was the American trackstar Jesse Owens of the 1930s

    since you are in Belgium why dont you go visit the Spinoza Institute at Utrecht and say hello to Renate Loll

    she and Jan Ambjorn are doing computer simulation quantum gravity experiments. I think it is the most interesting quantum gravity study that is happening now, in the world.

    It is just next door to you. why dont you go and see.
    a fourth year physics graduate student may sometimes do such things
     
  9. Dec 9, 2004 #8

    marcus

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    IIRC the ticket to the Einstein2005 conference is around 340 Euros.
    Is it worth this much?
    the main focus must be on Quantum Gravity since this is the most
    important thing happening in physics and is also related to the Einstein centennial.

    Among the plenary speakers there are two who know the Dynamical Triangulations work of Jan Ambjorn and Renate Loll
    Ashtekar has already referred to it in a recent survey paper ("Gravity and the Quantum") and
    Gerard 't Hooft is a colleague of Renate Loll at the physics institute at Utrecht.
    either or both should say something about DT in their talks at the conference.

    have to go.
    Later.
     
  10. Dec 9, 2004 #9

    dextercioby

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    My interest with computer simulation of anything is not a viable option of me,since i find computer software/programming just like "misspelling words in Chinese language".
    On the other hand,i know for sure that the American 400m hurdles specialist Ed Moses won 122 consecutive races between 1977 and 1987.And that i knew from Brittanica (from about 5 yrs ago).

    This is from Guiness webiste:
    Most Consecutive Athletics Track Wins
    The most consecutive track event wins is 122, by Ed Moses (USA) at the 400-m. hurdles, between August, 1977 and June, 1987. Moses’ domination of his sport was such that at one time he held the 13 fastest hurdling times ever recorded. He was inducted into the U.S Track and Field Hall of Fame in 1994.

    Daniel.

    PS.In Brittanica it wasn't specified the reason for which he wouldn't/couldn't take part at the World Championships in 1983.I guess i'll have to dig deep the net for this answer.
     
  11. Jun 25, 2005 #10
    Hi im new to this forum, and am in need of some assistance. I have plans to go to paris for the physics year events but cannot find anything on the web relating to the artificial rainbow experiment taking place over the river seine and the Eiffel tower (gravitational red-shift), Laser RADAR (“Teramobil”), Adaptive Optics (Astronomy) experiments. which are meant to be taking place in paris publicly. I just need the dates of when these are taking place.(and times if possible) it seems that there isnt a plethura of information on the net about these events. Cheers
    Raaz
    KCL
     
  12. Jun 25, 2005 #11

    marcus

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    Raaz, lucky you!

    I have no special way to find out the schedule of events, but I will see if anything turns up on google.

    Here is something
    http://www.obspm.fr/~unicom/manifestation/index.html
    it mentions a "Laser" demonstration. here are some events to come
    http://www.obspm.fr/~unicom/manifestation/manifavenir.html
    here are some events already past
    http://www.obspm.fr/~unicom/manifestation/archive.html

    Have you decided what dates you will be in Paris?

    BTW this conference is 18-22 July and i was looking at the list of talks and events, here are a few of them that would interest me. the whole list is at this page:

    http://einstein2005.obspm.fr/indexr.php

    Monday July 18

    11h45 - 12h25: Abhay Ashtekar « Gravity, Geometry and the Quantum »
    14h00 - 14h40: Brian Greene « The State of String Theory»
    14h45 - 15h30: Alain Connes « Noncommutative geometry and physics»
    15h45 - 16h25: Fay Dowker « Causal sets and discrete spacetime. »

    Tuesday July 19

    10h15 - 10h55: Carlo Rovelli «Loop Quantum Gravity »

    Wednesday 20 July

    12h00 - 12h40: Thanu Padmanabhan « Dark Energy - Mystery of the Millennium »

    Friday 22 July

    15h45 - 16h45: Gerard t'Hooft « Conclusion Talk »
    18h00 - 20h00: Final Cocktail at the "Observatoire de Paris"

    the three plenary speakers I highlighted are in non-string quantum gravity and will also be featured speakers at the October
    "Loops 05" conference. Their prominence at the Paris July conference is symbolic of the increased interest in quantum gravity alternatives to string these days.
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2005
  13. Jun 25, 2005 #12

    marcus

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    Renate Loll will be one of the speakers!
    http://einstein2005.obspm.fr/indexr.php


    Wednesday, 20 July 2005


    14h20-14h40 :R. Loll, W. Westra, Stefan Zohren
    « Nonperturbative sum over topologies in 2D Lorentzian Quantum Gravity »

    Willem Westra is a grad student of Loll at Utrecht, he has done his Masters with her and is now working on PhD----always in CDT.

    I will fetch a link to a photo of Willem Westra
    http://www1.phys.uu.nl/wwwitf/fotopagina's/foto's/Willem1.jpg

    Loll and Westra have two papers on "sum over topologies" in 1+1 dimensional CDT. They are from 2003. Including topology change is a longterm project, I suppose Westra PhD thesis is about that and that he is currently working on that.

    topology change is not usually included in path integral or canonical background independent (nonperturbative) QG. In Loop QG one does not include it.

    On wednesday at the Paris conference there are several parallel sessions and one of them is called "The nature of space-time". this is the parallel session where Loll and her two students give their paper.

    BTW to navigate at this site you click on "conference" at the top (do not click on "press") and then you get a sidebar menu with choices like
    "plenary program" and "parallel program"

    to find Loll talk, click on "parallel program" and then you get a menu of different parallel programs, and then you should click on "the nature of space-time" because THAT is the parallel session where the CDT paper is given.
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2005
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