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The European Language

  1. Nov 21, 2008 #1
    Not sure if we have discussed it before, but Europe definitely needs one language for more progress to unity. Here is an impression on the progress of that process.

     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 21, 2008 #2

    Danger

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    Old news, Andre; the Yanks have been doing that to English for decades. :rolleyes:
     
  4. Nov 21, 2008 #3
    Bah, that seems silly. I would still vote for Esperanto if I was Euro.

    "Euro-English" is probably a localization option in Linux already, as we speak.
     
  5. Nov 21, 2008 #4

    turbo

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    We're still working it out, Danger.

    BTW, if you think Mainers have a funny accent, you might want to take a little jaunt to Newfoundland.
     
  6. Nov 21, 2008 #5

    GCT

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    Europe has a history of hating each other - also they place a lot of emphasis in keeping their own history - not many people are going to want to disgard their own language for the sake of keeping their history. Also consider the fact that a lot of them are anti-globalization e.g. Cittaslow.

    http://www.cittaslow.org.uk/
     
  7. Nov 21, 2008 #6

    mgb_phys

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    In another recomendation the EU decided to switch to mobile phone 'txt spk' for all communications. Apart for the time and cost savings this wil also free up large numbers of vowels which can be donated to the former Yugoslavia where many town names have suffered severe shortages.
     
  8. Nov 21, 2008 #7

    mgb_phys

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    There is already a common language solution for Europe - it consists of English people speaking loudly and slowly to foreigners in English. It's worked for centuries - no need to change it now.
     
  9. Nov 21, 2008 #8

    turbo

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    Maybe this is why UK is not a full member. Wales might pose a problem, hoarding so many letters for place names.
     
  10. Nov 21, 2008 #9

    mgb_phys

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    Last edited: Nov 21, 2008
  11. Nov 21, 2008 #10

    Danger

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    I actually find the Maine accent charming in some regards; at least they're understandable. The Hawvawd twerps sound kinda fruity, though.
    My primary problem is with 'yawls'. You know, as in 'yawl come over for a beer.' That covers a large part of the southern US. The worst that I knew personally were from Oklahoma, although I've heard a few from Tennessee that weren't much better. They sound like that mumbly guy from the 'King of the Hill' cartoon. I'm pretty sure that the reason they're so inbred is that nobody outside of their own families can communicate with them.
    What I was actually referring to, though, was the spelling. Really now... who on Earth could use Lite, Thru, Nite etc. instead of the proper forms and expect to retain his dignity?
     
  12. Nov 21, 2008 #11

    Borek

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    Do I recall correctly that it was - originally - Mark Twain's text?
     
  13. Nov 21, 2008 #12

    lisab

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    I've never used "y'all" much - I'm a Left Coaster. But it's such a concise word! What do those of us in the North and West have to say... "all of you people come over for a beer." There's no substitute for y'all. Too bad it makes a person sound like such an idiot just by saying it.
     
  14. Nov 21, 2008 #13

    turbo

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    We don't need a collective word for an invite. Just say "beers and burgers on the deck tomorrow afternoon" and they'll show up; and since the invite was so general, lots of them will show up with hot dogs, hamburg, rolls, salads, appetizers and other snacks. In Maine, we have a pretty strong pot-luck tradition, and nobody but a former flat-lander will show up empty-handed.
     
  15. Nov 21, 2008 #14

    Borek

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  16. Nov 21, 2008 #15
    Y'all is a perfectly good contraction, as is Ain't. and i don't think people are any more inbred here than in places like pennsylvania, wisconsin, and oregon. much of what you're reacting to is suppression of the economy here for decades after the civil war and hollywood propaganda. i knew someone once that went to upstate new york on a job, and the guys there were actually asking here if we were like the characters in Deliverance.
     
  17. Nov 21, 2008 #16
    isn't English already a defacto standard in business and technical communication?
     
  18. Nov 21, 2008 #17

    Danger

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    :eek:
    Neither one is! Of course, I would expect a Yank to think that they are.
    I knew a couple from Tennessee when I was a kid. The guy was a draught-dodger, so they came up here and my father performed their wedding ceremony. They were two of the nicest people that I've know. The guy wasn't too bad intellectually, but his wife failed a grade 5 reading test. He was probably on a grade 7 level. And they were teachers in the US!
     
  19. Nov 21, 2008 #18

    mgb_phys

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    We need a no teacher left behind program!
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2008
  20. Nov 21, 2008 #19

    turbo

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    I prefer the Anguish Languish. Anybody who has not read "Ladle Rat Rotten Hut" should hie themselves to a place of penance.
     
  21. Nov 21, 2008 #20
    It's about time English was revamped. It's like using Fortran to program a modern operating system.

    English takes new words from other languages, which is great, but keeps the proper spelling a lot of the time, confusing people.
     
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