The Fascinating Tale of a Misinterpreted Message

  • Thread starter wolram
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In summary, the original song may be "That ombudsman don't know which way to turn" and the last line may be "It's a half-assed Ford and I'm shifting gears."
  • #1
wolram
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Have you ever had a verbal message, that has passed along a chain of
people and is nothing like the original?

One that my grandad always related was.

Officer in WW1, send reinforcements we are going to advance.

turned into, send three and four pence we are going to a dance.

three and four pence= three shillings and four pence pre decimal english
money.
 
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  • #2
We call it the Telephone game here, in a large group you start the message and by the time it gets back around to you, it has changed a great deal.
 
  • #3
Chinese Whispers, surely?
 
  • #4
brewnog said:
Chinese Whispers, surely?
I heard it was called Try These Whiskers. Haha. :rolleyes:
 
  • #5
Purple monkey dishwasher.
 
  • #6
icvotria said:
I heard it was called Try These Whiskers. Haha. :rolleyes:

Oh dear, oh dear, oh dear.
 
  • #7
Pour the money fishwalker.
 
  • #8
Poor honey, Skywalker.
 
  • #9
Door bunny fly-over
 
  • #10
In my family, our saying was always the same: "Rubber baby buggy bumpers."
 
  • #11
With my kids, it's "beef barney". One of them said "be funny" and I heard "beef barney". :redface: So, now that's what we say any time one of us hears something wrong. :zzz:

I love to tell my kids what I think the words are to some of the songs they listen to. One famous one is "blackeyed sis is growing up". :biggrin: Can anyone guess what song that is?
 
  • #12
Evo said:
... One famous one is "blackeyed sis is growing up". :biggrin: Can anyone guess what song that is?

Don't know.

I used to think that a certain popular tune on the radio in the 1970s was saying: "That ombudsman don't know which way to turn."
 
  • #13
Janitor said:
I used to think that a certain popular tune on the radio in the 1970s was saying: "That ombudsman don't know which way to turn."
I always thought that the last line of the first verse in Radar Love was "It's a half-assed Ford and I'm shifting gears". :redface:
 
  • #14
Danger said:
I always thought that the last line of the first verse in Radar Love was "It's a half-assed Ford and I'm shifting gears". :redface:

I thought the Eagles were singing "It's a girl my Lord, in a black, bent Ford." :-p
 
  • #15
Evo said:
With my kids, it's "beef barney". One of them said "be funny" and I heard "beef barney". :redface: So, now that's what we say any time one of us hears something wrong. :zzz:

I love to tell my kids what I think the words are to some of the songs they listen to. One famous one is "blackeyed sis is growing up". :biggrin: Can anyone guess what song that is?

I can't seem to find the song. I'm pretty sure it's Greenday, or maybe Blink182 and they are saying "I guess this is growing up." I looked for about half an hour and couldn't find it. :biggrin: I'm going to lose sleep over this I can already tell.
 
  • #16
Huckleberry said:
I'm going to lose sleep over this I can already tell.
Can't you just count squished ants until you drift off?
 

Related to The Fascinating Tale of a Misinterpreted Message

1. What is "The Fascinating Tale of a Misinterpreted Message" about?

"The Fascinating Tale of a Misinterpreted Message" is a fictional story that explores the consequences of miscommunication and how a simple misunderstanding can lead to unexpected and chaotic events. It follows the journey of a message that is misinterpreted and the ripple effect it has on the lives of the characters involved.

2. Who wrote "The Fascinating Tale of a Misinterpreted Message"?

The author of "The Fascinating Tale of a Misinterpreted Message" is unknown. It is often used as a creative writing prompt or exercise in communication and storytelling workshops.

3. What is the main lesson or theme of "The Fascinating Tale of a Misinterpreted Message"?

The main lesson of "The Fascinating Tale of a Misinterpreted Message" is the importance of effective communication. It highlights how miscommunication can lead to misunderstandings, conflicts, and unintended consequences. It also emphasizes the value of clarity, active listening, and considering different perspectives in communication.

4. Is "The Fascinating Tale of a Misinterpreted Message" based on a true story?

No, "The Fascinating Tale of a Misinterpreted Message" is a work of fiction. However, it is inspired by real-life incidents of miscommunication and the impact they can have on individuals and society.

5. How does "The Fascinating Tale of a Misinterpreted Message" relate to science?

While "The Fascinating Tale of a Misinterpreted Message" is not directly related to science, it does showcase the importance of effective communication in the scientific community. Inaccurate or misunderstood information can have serious consequences in the field of science, making clear and precise communication crucial for progress and advancement.

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