The Four Stages of Migraine

  1. http://headaches.about.com/cs/headpain101/a/anatomy_mig.htm

    Here's an interesting thing to note:

    So, interestingly enough, having a migraine attack does not necessarily mean having a headache.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. lisab

    Staff: Mentor

    Interesting, zooby. I never knew us migraine sufferers were refered to as "migraineurs" lol :rofl:.

    There was a time in my life when I was crippled by migraines. A non-sufferer wouldn't undersand how they interrupt normal life.

    But once I got my allergies under control, the headaches basically went away. Yet all those years I never had the classic allergy symptoms, i.e., nasal congestion, sneezing, etc.
     
  4. I have spring allergies, with nasal congestions and the whole nine yards, plus once in a while I will get that migraine too, but only during allergy season. I read about the aura before but never actually experienced it though, it's pretty scary.
     
  5. Leave it to the French!

    Did you experience the four stages?
     
  6. berkeman

    Staff: Mentor

    Interesting. I'd heard about the connection for some migrane sufferers between menstrual cycle and migranes, but hadn't heard about the allergy connection. Is it common?
     
  7. I can't find anything in the way of a hard science paper about this. Only this sort of thing:

    http://health.families.com/blog/allergies-and-migraines-linked

    Allergies are not mentioned as prime suspects in discussions of Migraine cause. More often you read it being laid to genetic disposition.
     
  8. I had one allergy doctor tell me my headaches are not related, while another doc said definitely. Now as I take allergy shots, migraines are triggered more often.
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2009
  9. What were your allergy symptoms?
     
  10. Sneezing, running nose, watery itchy eyes, and congestion.
     
  11. And the allergy shots trigger severe headaches? What's in the allergy shots?
     
  12. I used get migraines and nausea without the shots only during the allergy season. But with the shots it can occur any time during a year, but with less frequency as in the allergy season.

    I have custom prepared allergen doses, which are the actual things that the immune system responds to, and there is a plethora of those. If it works, it should reduce sensitivity of the immune system to these allergens.
     
  13. So, you're essentially triggering the allergic response, which supports the alleged link between the allergy and the headaches, right?
     
  14. somasimple

    somasimple 716
    Gold Member

    The most interesting thing in the sequence is that migraineurs are aware of the sequence itself.
    If you know the images of a movie you may change the end and/or play it, actively.
    It just means that you have some control on it: principally, headhaches which is the painful state.
     
  15. Andy Resnick

    Andy Resnick 5,860
    Science Advisor
    Education Advisor

    I had spring allergies while in graduate school (Tennessee Valley region), and would get regular migraines during allergy season. When I left the area, the allergies subsided, and so did the migraines.

    Feeling the 'aura'- and there's no question what that feels like- was never a good day.
     
  16. Of what did your aura consist?
     
  17. I'd get a nasty cold every year around Christmas until I realized it was an allergy reaction to the decorated pine tree in my home.

    I've had one migraine in my lifetime which occured when I was twelve years old. That was a mighty long, long time ago. :smile:

     
  18. That seems to be the case. When I started this immunotherapy before spring, got a migraine three to four days after the first shot, and so for the first three weeks at same time intervals. And the shots were administered every week as well. Then later on I've been getting less migraines, and they happen very erratically.
     
  19. Only once? Why do you think it was a migraine?

    http://headaches.about.com/cs/education/a/mig_not_ha.htm
     
  20. Zoobyshoe, a licensed physician diagnosed it as a *migraine* due to the onset of my first menstrual period. (Please note previous post on p.g.1) I was flat on my back unable to do anything. It was horrible, and I won’t ever forget it even at my age (over fifty)! Apparently, that migraine that occured in my youth was a once in a lifetime event, which is rare. As far as headaches, I should mention that I’ve only had a few. I'll leave it at that since I don’t think it wise to conduct a full blown clinical trial study on an internet forum about migraines and headaches. :smile:
     
  21. I see.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share a link to this question via email, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?