The Free Will Theorem: Exploring its Meaning & Implications

In summary, the conversation discusses a theorem from the physics community that states that if humans have free will, then the rest of nature is not deterministic. This can be further simplified to say that if there is free will, then something is not deterministic. However, this can also be seen as a tautology for those who understand it well. The conversation also refers to a previous discussion on this topic on a forum.
  • #1
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What do you think about
http://arxiv.org/abs/quant-ph/0604079 ?

Let me explain how I understood it, but it is possible that I misunderstood something.
In simple terms, the theorem says the following:
If humans have free will, then the rest of nature is not deterministic.

But if you treat humans on an equal footing with the rest of nature, then this theorem can be further simplified as:
If there is free will, then something is not deterministic.

Sounds almost like a tautology, doesn't it?

But of course, every theorem can be viewed as a tautology by those who understand it very well.
 
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  • #3
Thanks RVBuckeye!
 

Related to The Free Will Theorem: Exploring its Meaning & Implications

1. What is the Free Will Theorem?

The Free Will Theorem is a mathematical theorem that was proposed by mathematicians John Conway and Simon Kochen in 2006. It states that if humans have free will, then individual quantum events must also have free will.

2. How does the Free Will Theorem relate to quantum physics?

The Free Will Theorem is based on the principles of quantum physics, which states that at the subatomic level, particles can exist in multiple states at once. This means that the outcome of a quantum event cannot be predicted with certainty, and this randomness is what allows for free will.

3. What are the implications of the Free Will Theorem?

The implications of the Free Will Theorem are profound and far-reaching. If the theorem is true, it means that free will is not just a human concept, but a fundamental part of the universe. It also raises questions about the nature of reality and the role of consciousness in the universe.

4. Is the Free Will Theorem widely accepted by scientists?

The Free Will Theorem is a relatively new concept and is still being debated and studied by scientists. While some scientists have found the theorem to be compelling, others have raised criticisms and alternative theories. The scientific community is still working to fully understand and validate the Free Will Theorem.

5. How does the Free Will Theorem impact our understanding of free will?

The Free Will Theorem challenges traditional notions of free will as a solely human concept. It suggests that free will may be a fundamental aspect of the universe and not limited to conscious beings. This can have implications for our understanding of determinism, morality, and the role of consciousness in the universe.

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