Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

The Future is Nano

  1. Jun 10, 2006 #1
    Today whereever you go u will find people talking about nanao. now what is nano? Nano is the unit of length=10^-9. in nano technology it is the collection of atoms having dimention in nano range. Almost all the property of the particle changes to that of the bulk.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 10, 2006 #2

    Astronuc

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Nano refers to submicron. In polycrystalline materials, e.g. metals or ceramics, grains are on the order of several microns. In nano-engineering, materials engineers/scientists are trying to 'manipulate' or control the grain microstructures and grain bounday composition and morphology.

    This past week, I saw some interesting presentations on nano-engineering of structural materials this week, including 'grain boundary engineering' for improved mechanical and corrosion performance by reducing the 'mis-orientations' or mis-fits at grain boundaries.
     
  4. Jun 12, 2006 #3

    Claude Bile

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    Its not just the mechanical properties that can be changed, the optical properties can also be tweaked by changing the shape of nanoparticles, for example gold nanorods will absorb and scatter light differently to gold nanospheres.

    This is essentially because the plasmon resonances in a nanoparticle are entirely surface resonances (no bulk resonances), which are very sensitive to the surrounding environment.

    Claude.
     
  5. Jul 5, 2006 #4
    Nano Hype

    I was preparing a presentation the other day and i cam across a paper by IOP which was quite good one. Its not that Nano Industry is another industry just like computers, rather its an enabling tech just like transistors which can be used to make up anything. The recent hype is similar to the dotcom bubble and it has created myths for many people. Fact of the matter is that it just alllows us the ability to manipulate the matter at nano matter scael and nothing else.
     
  6. Jul 6, 2006 #5
    Sorry, can't help it, slightly OT but I think I should share this about nano as prefix for units.

    Apart from the nanometer getting more important, we also have the bananometer, being the unit of distance defined as the distance covered between tripping over a banano peel and hitting the ground. Also, bananosecond, defined as the time frame in which this happens.
     
  7. Jul 21, 2006 #6
    Your definition needs a little reworking. There are many physical advantages of manipulating matter at this scale. For example in machinery, molecular circuitry based on nanotubes (cylinders of carbon atoms approximately ten atoms across) are physically able to operate at terahertz speeds in relation to gigahertz speed with todays silicon-based transistors. This is because the smaller the area of the transistor, the faster the circuitry sends information. Also, medical technology will be increasingly effected by this nano scale manipulation. Medicine on this scale is essential for the manipulation of the human biological system at the molecular level. This means that diseases can easily be traced to their origin. This will change means of transporting medicine, nanotubes at this scale can efficiently target in on and examine structural damages at the cellular level. Its technology is a paradigm in the understanding of the molecular level and someday quantum levels.
     
  8. Jul 22, 2006 #7

    Pythagorean

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    This makes me think nanotech's should get together with the people who just recently froze light in a condensate.

    I'm starting to think condensates are the future.
     
  9. Jul 22, 2006 #8
    Whats your source of "frozen light" information?
     
  10. Jul 22, 2006 #9

    Pythagorean

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

  11. Jul 22, 2006 #10
    What a great time to bring that up. I'm at the cusp of going to grad school for something and I'm torn between condensates and nano. :/
     
  12. Jul 23, 2006 #11
    Are you guys talking about molecular nanotechnology (MNT, a la Drexler, Merkle, Freitas) or something else?
     
  13. Jul 23, 2006 #12
    Sure, those are some of the popular names.

    But, so far, nanotechnology seems to include only fermionic structures (chemistry), and has not yet included bosonic structures (condensed matter physics).

    If the two fields can interact in an interesting ways, that would be chic.
     
  14. Jul 23, 2006 #13

    berkeman

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    That's a pretty interesting article. At first I thought it was a joke, but it seems to be serious. Especially the part about publishing in Nature.

    That article is from 2001, and the latest that I can find about this is from 2002. Does anybody know what the latest status of that project is? The part where the light re-emits going the *same* direction from the cloud is pretty amazing if true.
     
  15. Jul 23, 2006 #14
    Just a few weeks ago, an article about reversing and accelerating the speed of light through meta-materials.

    http://www.external.ameslab.gov/final/News/2006rel/metamaterials.htm

    Some videos too.
     
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2006
  16. Jul 23, 2006 #15

    Pythagorean

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    I did a little more research and found this, last updated 2003:

    "Dr. Hau’s scientific and service contributions have been recognized through honors that include the MacArthur Fellow 2001-2006;"

    I'm assuming that once the grant money runs out (some time this year) she'll release results for refinancing. I have very little knowledge of science financing, so this is just an undergraduate's assumption.
     
  17. Jul 23, 2006 #16

    Pythagorean

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    I agree. I don't really know enough about either field to fully comprehend the meaning of this assertion, but it sounds very appealing.
     
  18. Jul 23, 2006 #17

    ZapperZ

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Education Advisor

    Er... since when is "fermionic structures" implies chemistry and "bosonic structures" is condensed matter physics?

    Have you looked at the section where nanoscience papers are published in Phys. Rev. Lett.?

    Zz.
     
  19. Jul 23, 2006 #18
    An online particle physics tutorial and other sources I've read have associated them this way. Fermions obey Pauli-exclusion and allow the creation of ordinary matter and bosons don't and form condensed matter.

    I understand it's not a strict pairing, since some molecules have additive integer spin and exhibit some bosonic behavior. Sorry, I should have realized that that was poorly worded. :redface:

    Do you mean the "Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics" section? I've been looking for physical "nanoscience" articles for a while now, and I'm starting to get the impression that physicists aren't especially fond of the word.
     
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2006
  20. Jul 23, 2006 #19

    ZapperZ

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Education Advisor

    You need to be more careful with the terminology. "Condensed matter physics" is a FIELD of study in physics. "Condensates" or "BE condensation" is a state of matter due to bosons. These two are NOT the same thing.

    http://www.physicspost.com/science-article-209.html

    Zz.
     
  21. Jul 23, 2006 #20
    Ohhh, I see. Not "BE condensates," though, because that's redundant? Thank you for that post and the link to Coleman's paper.

    So, do you know of any interesting links between BE condensation and nanoscience?
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: The Future is Nano
  1. Nano batteries? (Replies: 3)

  2. Nano Technology (Replies: 4)

  3. Nano science (Replies: 1)

  4. Nano particles (Replies: 3)

Loading...