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I The integral of energy?

  1. Feb 14, 2019 at 2:35 AM #1
    So the classical law of force given by Newton is F= ma = dp/dt = qE. Thus if i integrate the last two equivalents I get:
    ∫(dp/dt)dt = q∫Edt
    p + C = q∫Edt
    correct?
    then what would the integral of energy be? I know that E = P/t. I guess I could let P = VI = I^2 * R = (dq/dt)^2 *R eerrr then E = (dq/dt)^2 *R/t and
    p + C = qR∫(dq/dt)^2 / t dt
    am i getting somewhere or not? Im just curious to see what integrating E can get me in relationship to momentum. Thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 14, 2019 at 6:40 AM #2

    Dale

    Staff: Mentor

    The E above is the electric field, not the energy.
     
  4. Feb 14, 2019 at 7:00 AM #3
    im dumb asf bro.
     
  5. Feb 14, 2019 at 8:23 AM #4

    Dale

    Staff: Mentor

    No worries. You just have to keep in mind what the equations mean and not just juggle symbols around.

    The integral of E wrt time is the electric impulse per unit charge on a charge experiencing the electric field E. Impulse is the change in momentum, so that matches with the equation you derived.
     
  6. Feb 14, 2019 at 9:57 AM #5

    DrClaude

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Even when combining the latin alphabet with the greek one, there is not enough symbols to go around, and they get reused all the time. Part of learning physics is understanding what each symbol means in a specific context.
     
  7. Feb 14, 2019 at 4:41 PM #6
    Okay good! That will definitely help me understand what the equation means. I havent studied electromagnetism in my studies yet so some of these equations are new!
     
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