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The L.H.C. Electron Theory

  1. Sep 10, 2008 #1
    This is a very uneducated question. So don't take it too seriously.
    I was thinking. The reason they're using beams of protons in the L.H.C. Is because protons have a positive charge. Meaning that they will explode, when they collide.

    If they used electrons (negative charge), instead of protons. Would they implode? If they did implode. Would that mean, that such an immense amount of energy, in such an immensely tiny bit of room, create enough energy, to rip a hole in the space time continuum, creating a worm hole?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 10, 2008 #2

    malawi_glenn

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    no they would not implode.

    And also, protons does not explode when they collide...

    The reason for why they use protons is many, they are heavy and does not emit as much syncrotron radiation as electrons would do at that energy and curvature radius.

    After they have done beam with protons, they will switch to heavy ions, such as lead.

    And energy available in the collision is not related to charge, only mass and velocity.
     
  4. Sep 10, 2008 #3

    ZapperZ

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    Er.. they had already used electrons (or electron-positron) collisions. That was LEP.

    It has nothing to do with things "imploding". The physics isn't that simple. If the LHC is successful and has tantalizing hints of other things beyond it, then the ILC (International Linear Collider) will be built next that will collide electrons-electrons and electron-positron with even greater energy than LEP.

    Zz.
     
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