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The movie Independence Day

  1. Apr 6, 2016 #1
    When the US fighter aircraft fire on the alien spacecraft, the pilots learn that the spacecraft is protected by some type of an invisible force field. Does our current understanding of how the universe works allow for such a thing?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 6, 2016 #2

    berkeman

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    Staff: Mentor

    Not really. The closest thing would be eddy current braking. Maybe try a Google search on that...? :smile:
     
  4. Apr 7, 2016 #3
    Sort of, Boeing has a patent for a force field, however, it's nothing like Independence Day or Star Trek. You can hold material in place using a magnetic field and use those fields to counter things like shockwaves as well as light. It's not permanent and a computer has to detect a threat, and counter it on a case by case basis.

    Such a device, given enough time and money for research could certainly destroy a missile, aircraft, and absorb the atomic bomb. What it could not do is absorb the bullet fired at the coke can in Area 51.
     
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