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Medical The Mozart Effect:

  1. Mar 23, 2006 #1
    I would be interested in knowing if "Mozart Effect" is true and can improve your inteligence,intuition and creativity, i have just downloaded the composition of his called "Sonata for 2 pianos" in .mp3 my question is what other songs or compositions made by MOzart can be interesting to improve your "Mozart Effect"..thank you :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

    I,m a Physicist so for us the intuition and creativity is very important so i would like a way to improve it... also i heard that according to Einstein,s Biographers he listened Mozart when investigating his theories also i would like to know if playing an instrument like violin or other can be useful to develop your I.Q
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 23, 2006 #2
    What I would like to know is the site where you downloaded the file and the performers of that composition. :biggrin:
  4. Mar 23, 2006 #3


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    I think it was a false myth.
  5. Mar 24, 2006 #4
    intuition ...do you know what intuition is......it comes from hard work not..listening to a composer ..not matter how good he was......i cant say that your wrong ,,but can say i definately dont get it.....maybe in real life i guess...but im talking about in physics ..hard work is the key..how else..
    . i think that because alot of physics concepts aren't from using ur eyes but from experiment and knowing.....

    correct me if u think im wrong plz

    and creativity comes ffrom practise aswell i dont think no super quick method like listening to music..might make you smarter but u want creatuivity...i dont know much about brain science...but well an creative person like you would be quite open minded so ..maybe you wont dismiss what im saying immediately..

    tell me what u think..
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2006
  6. Mar 24, 2006 #5
    While it doesn't seem conclusive that listening to classical music will increase your creativity, it might have several positive effects. Listening to different musical patterns, chords, rhythms, all engage the mind in different ways. And certainly playing musical instruments will have this same effect, but possibly stronger.
  7. Mar 24, 2006 #6
    Thanks to all of you for your responses...perhaps it,s a Hoax or the typical myth explain a person,s genious (Einstein for example) i have tried "sonata for 2 pianos" or something similar..my experiences are that i don,t feel more "intuitive" to say in any way...perhaps i like a physicist am seeking a "fast-way" to increase my creativity and intuition instead of trying to work harder

    P.D:if somebody is interested i can e-mail him/her the "Sonata for 2 pianos" to listen at his/her computer just e-mail me to josegarc2002@yahoo.es
  8. Mar 24, 2006 #7


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    Cognitive Daily had a string of posts summarizing research on the Mozart effect. Here are the links:


    I recommend reading the links as they are concise and accessible, but here's a brief summary. There does seem to be some beneficial cognitive effect on spatial reasoning that ensues from listening to Mozart, but it is not exclusive to Mozart: this effect also holds for classical music by other composers, and indeed other styles of music altogether. Further, the means by which this effect occurs seems to be the effects of music on mood and arousal, rather than cognitive processing of musical structure. Music at higher tempos promote arousal, and music in major keys promote positive mood, and in turn higher degrees of arousal and positive mood benefit cognitive performance.
  9. Mar 27, 2006 #8
    I AGREE THAT IT MAY WORK... but creativity and intuition i think hav to be gained by doing things ..not sitting around in an armchair...how do u know ur not fooling urself........do both ..do stuff and do mottzart
  10. Mar 27, 2006 #9


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    Well, as Saint James said to Saint Paul, "You show me your fine thoughts, and I'll show you my works". Or words to that effect.
  11. Mar 27, 2006 #10


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    How long have you been proficient in English? Are you a typing student?
  12. Mar 27, 2006 #11
    Isn't it likely that this works across all mediums to differing degrees? I know that I am much more inspired to write and to produce artwork when I have been reading books or perusing art.
  13. Mar 29, 2006 #12
    I don't think his genius will "rub off" on you

    I would assume it'd have the opposite effect, hearing repeated patterns would seem to dull the brain
  14. Apr 4, 2006 #13
    Aside from emotional and mood stimulation, I don't agree with the direct effect on intelligence. I believe the original Mozart study was a flawed experiment, or the results were misinterpreted.

    From what I can recall in reading "The Blank Slate," Steven Pinker says the study was done on a small number of adults. While it was statistically shown that the test group did slightly better than the control group during testing, the results were inconclusive. Yet, suddenly the state of Georgia made Mozart for Mothers CDs free for all mothers and expecting mothers.

    My opinion? There hasn't been enough testing to show conclusive results. I also find it strange that a test on a small group of adults could suddenly be interpreted as being correlated with unborn babies.
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